Calling a Coup a Coup, The George Zimmerman Trial and More

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Friday, July 12, 2013

Why the US government refuses to call the removal of Mohamed Morsi a "coup," the lack of discussion of race in the George Zimmerman trial, and the media frenzy over the "royal baby".

A Dark, Complex Story

Unlike the Egyptian revolution of 2011, the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi is a story without a clear protagonist or an easy, happy summary. Brooke talks with NPR's Deb Amos about the way the media both here and in the region has been handling that complexity. Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News.

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A Coup by any other name

A military coup is essentially a military action that transfers government power from one entity to another. This sounds a lot like what happened in Egypt with the military's removal of President Mohamed Morsi, but the new Egyptian leadership - and the Obama administration - are refusing to call it a coup. Bob talks to Harvard law professor Noah Feldman about using the C-word.

Shigeto - Ringleader

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Cable News and Trayvon Martin

When the shooting of Trayvon Martin became national news in 2012, it opened up a discussion about race and the criminal justice system in the United States. But since the trial of George Zimmerman began three weeks ago, coverage has taken a turn toward the sensational. Brooke talks to Tampa Bay Times media critic Eric Deggans about the evolving quality of coverage of the Trayvon Martin story.

Yo La Tengo - Cornelia and Jane

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A TMZ Approach to Local TV News

A new tv news show launched in New Jersey this week, called Chasing NJ. It’s supposed to revolutionize local news by modelling it after syndicated celebrity-gossip show TMZ. Chasing NJ has already sparked outcry from Jersey politicians who want the FCC to rescind the license of its broadcast station, WWOR. Bob talks to the Brian Stelter of the New York Times about the new show.

Bob Pinado - Africa

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I want my slow TV!

The Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation has been creating some of the world's slowest TV - shows like a 7 hour train ride or 18 hours of salmon fishing. Norwegian audiences are loving it. Brooke speaks with Rune Moklebust of the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation about why he thinks so-called "boring TV" is actually quite exciting.

Nina Rota - Il Casanova di Federico Fellini 

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The Tech Lobby Comes of Age

Last year the single largest corporate lobbyist was General Electric.  The second biggest? A new arrival, called...Google. Time Magazine White House correspondent Michael Scherer tells Brooke what took the tech industry so long to get lobbying and what they're doing to influence politics.   

Andrew Bird - Orpheo Looks Back

 

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Royal Baby Media Frenzy

During the past couple months, the media have been scrambling to cover all angles of the impending birth of Kate Middleton's "royal baby." Included in those angles: What clothes the pregnant Duchess wears, what the baby's gender will be, and just how Kate Middleton will give birth. Bob reports from London on the royal baby media frenzy.

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