Why Global Stories Matter

Friday, August 23, 2013

Transcript

News outlets are cutting back more and more on foreign coverage, even though international events obviously have profound effects domestically. Brooke talks to MIT's Ethan Zuckerman, author of Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection about the past and future of foreign reporting, and how he would like to do away with the term "foreign news" altogether.

Guests:

Ethan Zuckerman

Hosted by:

Brooke Gladstone

Comments [6]

Elizabeth Fuller from New York

In the piece, Brook references a *possibly Harvard* study that indicates that the internet has polarized the divide between those who are actively curious and now MORE informed vs. more passive users who are now LESS informed. Does anyone know what study this actually was? I'm at a loss.

Sep. 08 2013 06:59 PM

This story reminded me of Maslow's "hierarchy of needs". I think it is safe to say that for most working Americans "global stories" are pretty low on their lists of concerns. I think you have to be doing really well to have time to worry about events on the other side of the globe unless they have some significant impact on your life.

Aug. 26 2013 08:03 AM
Joel Demay from San Francisco

Why bother having foreign journalist stationed in those capitals. If I want to hear about what is going in the UK, I just go to http://www.theguardian.co.uk/ by definition it will provide me a better view that whatever foreign correspodant can ever aspire to.

Aug. 25 2013 10:52 PM
deserthackberry from Belton, TX

I had to read an article in the UK's Daily Mail to find out what was going on with my own state's DPS officers: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2384030/Texas-State-Troopers-illegal-body-cavity-searches-indicate-kind-department-policy.html. The problem isn't a lack of global coverage. It's a lack of coverage, period.

Aug. 25 2013 03:21 PM

You've convinced me that coverage of events in "other countries" has gone down, and you've convinced me that awareness of events in "other countries" is important to *you*, but you have not convinced me that awareness of events in "other countries" is relevant to my life. You might have spent some time on that. Personally, I think your premise that events in "other countries" (e.g., Nairobi) are relevant to all Americans is wrong. I they were, Americans would want to know about those events.

Aug. 24 2013 11:50 PM
jim wattenmaker

keeping up to date on 'the world' seems more and more like a hopeless task for those of us who have more to do than reading 'the news'

Aug. 24 2013 10:24 PM

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