The New Emoji-Only Social Network is Probably a Hoax, But We Want it to Be Real

Monday, June 30, 2014 - 04:15 PM

I have a totally unscientific theory that as time goes on the odds increase of any (yes, any) given person communicating with me entirely through emoji. 

The announcement that we’ll be getting 250 new, albeit very white, emojis gave this theory fuel. Today I have some more fuel for it: emojli, the “emoji-only” social network, which promises “No words. No Spam. Just emoji.”

The network isn’t up yet, but my money says it’s a joke. A video on the emojli homepage says it’s for real, but since it’s the creation of a broadcast engineer and a comedian, that claim should be balanced with an industrial size dose of skepticism.

And yet, even though emojli is probably a hoax, in my heart-of-hearts I hope it isn’t. A couple of weeks ago, when the new emojis were announced, PJ made a very good point about why they’re so well-liked and frequently used:

The charm of Emoji is that rather than giving us words or symbols to describe our experience, it gives us a bunch of mostly random pictographs, and we have to invent ways to use them in a way that makes meaning. Emoji’s charm is in how broken and inadequate it is.

The idea of a small corner of the Internet devoted to putting this into practice is just too cool to write off. I’m not about to give up other means of communication, but I’d relish the type of playground of meaning that something like emojli could be. So if it is a joke, how about someone build the real thing?

And if it isn’t a joke, you can reserve your username now. Mine is Thumbs Up Sign+Squared OK+Thumbs Up Sign

 

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TLDR is a short podcast and blog about the internet by PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman. You can subscribe to our podcast here. You can follow our blog here. We’re also on Twitter, and we play Team Fortress 2 more or less constantly, so find us there if you like to communicate via computer games from six years ago.

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