Coverage of the Government Shutdown, Tweeting TV Audiences, and More

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Friday, October 04, 2013

A look at the media coverage - both here and abroad - of the government shutdown, how social media is recreating the old television viewing experience, and California's attempts to legislate the internet.

Hosted by:

Bob Garfield and Brooke Gladstone

False Equivalency Around the Government Shutdown

With the federal government grinding to a halt this week, the specter of false equivalency rose up around the media landscape. The Atlantic’s James Fallows talked to Brooke about his quest to have the media stop over-prizing ‘objectivity’ and start communicating reality.

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Compromise in a Polarized Political World

Political scientist Brendan Nyhan says the roots of the shutdown aren’t so much in a failure of leadership from John Boehner or Harry Reid or President Obama. Rather, he tells Bob, all three men are at the mercy of an increasingly polarized political landscape that makes compromise extremely difficult.

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Global Media Reaction to the Shutdown

In the US the media have almost universally glommed on to the “blame game” narrative of the government shutdown. Reaction from around the world has been most diverse. Aviva Shen of the progressive website ThinkProgress speaks with Bob about reactions from around the globe. 

John Zorn - The Dream Machine

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Paid Partisans

A recent study found that people will more accurately describe political realities--even if it contradicts their own partisan views--if they are paid for their correct answers. Brooke speaks to Gregory Huber, one of the authors of the study, about their findings.

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Legislating Speech On the Internet in California and the Rest of the Country

Recently, California passed a number of laws meant to protect individuals online from harassment and from themselves, but those laws have potentially problematic speech implications. Bob talks with Santa Clara University Law Professor Eric Goldman about the details of these laws, and how they can affect the rest of the country.

Paul Whiteman - Love Nest

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Watching Each Other Watch

Last Sunday, AMC aired the final episode of Breaking Bad. You may not watch the show, but if you’ve been hanging around anywhere online, its presence is inescapable. Fans on Twitter tweeted 100,000 times a day about the show leading up to the finale. Brooke talks with Kevin Slavin, an Assistant Professor of Media Arts and Sciences at  MIT and co-founder of Everybody at Once, who says that fans’ social media interactions are crucial to the modern television experience. 

Paul Whiteman - Love Nest

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India's Right to Information

India, infamous for its bureaucracy and corruption, has one of the strongest freedom of information laws in the world. OTM reporter Jamie York went to India to talk to Subhash Agrawal, Nikhil Dey, Aruna Roy, Shailesh Gandhi and Sowmya Kidambi (and to hear Shankar Singh sing) about the struggle to achieve the law and the power and pitfalls of such a transformative tool.

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