Breaking Bad in Spanish, the "Hispanic Walter Cronkite", and More

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Friday, July 04, 2014

An exploration of Hispanic media today, including the remaking of popular American shows into Spanish, a conversation with Hispanic TV's star newscaster, and a challenge to Bob and Brooke to discuss it all without sucking.

Es La Hora: Hispanic Media in English

An overview of the Hispanic media landscape, including a list of rules for how to discuss Hispanics without sucking (#NoMames). Bob and Brooke speak with Mark Hugo Lopez of the Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project, and Julio Ricardo Varela from the website Latino Rebels. You can find Latino Rebels' collection of #NoMames fails here.

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Hispanic TV's Star Newscaster

Univision anchor Jorge Ramos has been dubbed "Star newscaster of Hispanic TV." In addition to his role as news anchor on the Spanish-language network, Ramos now hosts "America with Jorge Ramos", an English-language program on the recently launched Fusion network. Brooke speaks with Ramos about how his new job is exposing him to a wider media audience.

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Spanish AP Style Guide

While an estimated 450 million people use Spanish, they don't all use it the same way. So in 2012, the Associated Press created a Spanish-language style book in the hopes of creating consistency among journalists across the US and Latin America. Bob speaks with Alejandro Manrique, director of the AP Spanish service and one of the style book's editors.

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Meet Walter Blanco

"Metastasis" is an almost scene-by-scene Spanish-language remake of the hit show "Breaking Bad," starring Colombian actor Diego Trujillo  who has also worked on remakes of "Desperate Housewives" and "Grey's Anatomy." Trujillo discusses remaking popular American shows in Spanish.

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Radio Ambulante

"Radio Ambulante" is a Spanish-language radio program that's been called "This Latin American Life". Bob speaks with the show's host and executive producer Daniel Alarcón about the program and its goal of telling uniquely Latin American stories. Alarcón is also a novelist. You can find out more about his books here.

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Did We Suck?

After hearing the rest of this special hour, Latino Rebels co-founder Julio Ricardo Varela returns to tell Brooke if we accomplished our goal to "not suck" in our exploration of Hispanic media. He tells Brooke why we didn't do as well as we'd hoped, despite our best intentions.

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