A Rabble-Rouser On Jeopardy

Friday, February 07, 2014

Transcript

The latest Jeopardy sensation has thus far amassed $102,800 dollars on a four-game winning streak -- but his playing style is making traditionalists shudder. Arthur Chu has rejected the unwritten rule that the guy (or gal) with the most facts wins, and replaced it with the idea that you can outwit your opponent with the wily application of game theory. Brooke talks with Arthur about his winning strategy and the media firestorm he's ignited. 

Guests:

Arthur Chu

Hosted by:

Brooke Gladstone

Comments [4]

Joe from Philadelphia

Arthur Chu is hardly the first person to employ this strategy. He did it because it works - but it only works if you can actually answer the tougher question on the bottom of the board. He didn't cheat. Complaints about traditionalism are just sour grapes.

Jeopardy has NEVER been about "the unwritten rule that the guy (or gal) with the most facts wins." If it were, all the clues would have the same value, and Double Jeopardy wouldn't exist at all. You win by getting the most money, not the most correct answers.

Mar. 13 2014 03:08 PM
Thatwood B. Telling from The Village

Indignation over a guy not following Jeopardy's traditions must be similar to the reaction of the first football coach whose opponent ran a flea-flicker, Statue of Liberty, double-reverse or other "trick play." Must've been fuming! "Hey-- that's not gentlemanly!" And Jeopardy players who don't run the categories from top to bottom run risks similar to those of football players who don't run the ball up the middle of the field. They run the risk of getting tripped up by being too clever by half. It's a risk Chu is willing to take in the hope that it will be a winning strategy for him. I say, more power to him!

Feb. 08 2014 11:21 PM
Tony from Brooklyn

Because playing to tie keeps you in the game. Playing to win by $1 also risks losing by $1.

Feb. 08 2014 09:50 AM
Colette from NYC

I loved Arthur on Jeopardy - he woke things up - was fun trying to understand his strategy - one thing I wish you would have asked, why he made a final jeopardy wager he knew could (and did) result in a tie with another contestant

Feb. 08 2014 08:10 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.