#5 - Goodbye, Secret, Invisible Internet

Thursday, October 31, 2013 - 05:52 PM

Up until this fall, there was a secret internet. You probably heard about one part of it, the Silk Road, but that was just one secret website among many. This week, we talk to Gawker's Adrian Chen about the rest of the dark part of the internet, and how it's been damaged by the Silk Road arrests. 

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Comments [5]

P. Kozikkn

I love On the Media, but this podcast of TLDR totally misrepresents anonymous online newtorking systems. It jumps on the bandwagon of an increasingly popular misuse of the term "dark web," which does not actually exist in the way described in this podcast, all the while radically distorting a fairly old term, which only refers to any information online that is not directly accessible through normal internet searches (e.g. your bank account information, online library catalogue records).

For real information and good reporting about the actual current state of anonymous online networking, including its predominantly postive socially valuable uses, people can read this story:

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/nov/05/tor-beginners-guide-nsa-browser

Nov. 06 2013 10:07 PM
RichardM from Welland!

Hi. I liked the deep web story. Normally I am complaining about podcasts not being critical enough, so criticism was a welcome thing. However, I thought you came down too hard on what the deep web is, and why its important. Tor networks are important, because there is a need for legitimate anonymity on the internet. As mentioned in On The Media this week, even encryption isn't necessarily safe. In a sense, deep web has a distinguished pedigree (DARPA, EFF). Tor was strongly involved in the Arab Spring (what, not Twitter!?) and Snowdon's leaks. So ok your story was about Silk Road, but I thought you tarred deep web with the same brush which I thought unwarranted. Keep up the good work though!

Nov. 06 2013 01:19 AM
gene keenan

I don't agree with the assesment of Adrian that the deep web is dead and sites like silk road are gone. He was wrong about the size of the story and wrong about what will happen next. Build a higher wall and someone will build a higher ladder. Just look at what has happened to torrent sites like Oinks Pink Palace, The Box, etc. They were replaced by sites like waffles.fm and what.cd which are now even larger than Oinks. This is the not even the deep web. As long as there is demand for something, there will be those who will figure out how to supply that demand.

Nov. 05 2013 04:44 PM
zippo

I appreciate Adrian Chen's pursuit of and work on this story, but my sense is he doesn't sound like someone who yet fully understands the community and technology being discussed.

Nov. 03 2013 11:47 PM
Kim Scharff from Stt. Louis

This new show is superb. Funny, sensitive and pulls the listener in for every savory detail. Many thanks On The Media!

Nov. 01 2013 03:18 PM

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TLDR is a short podcast and blog about the internet by PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman. You can subscribe to our podcast here. You can follow our blog here. We’re also on Twitter, and we play Team Fortress 2 more or less constantly, so find us there if you like to communicate via computer games from six years ago.

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