Associated Press

On The Media

Spanish AP Style Guide

Friday, November 28, 2014

While an estimated 450 million people use Spanish, they don't all use it the same way. 

Comment

On The Media

Spanish AP Style Guide

Friday, July 04, 2014

While an estimated 450 million people use Spanish, they don't all use it the same way. So in 2012, the Associated Press created a Spanish-language style book in the hopes of creating consistency among journalists across the US and Latin America. Bob speaks with Alejandro Manrique, director of the AP Spanish service and one of the style book's editors.

Comments [3]

On The Media

The Totally Legal Subpoena

Friday, May 17, 2013

Earlier this week, the Department of Justice revealed that it had subpoenaed the phone records of Associated Press reporters and editors over the course of two months in 2012. Many in the media were not pleased at what the AP called an "unprecedented intrusion." Brooke talks with University of Chicago Law Professor Geoffrey Stone who says, unprecedented or not, the DOJ's actions were certainly legal.

Comments [2]

On The Media

Saying Goodbye to "Illegal Immigrants"

Friday, April 05, 2013

On Tuesday the Associated Press eliminated the phrases "illegal immigrantand "undocumented" from its stylebook. Previous OTM guest Jose Antonio Vargas has been campaigning for this change for months on the grounds that “actions are illegal – not people.” The AP has conceded this point of view, but it’s not because of political correctness. Bob talks to AP editor Tom Kent, who explains that the change is part of a broader overhaul of the AP stylebook.

 

William Tyler - We Can't Go Home Again

Comments [5]

On The Media

In Defense of "Homophobia"

Friday, December 07, 2012

The next print edition of the Associated Press Stylebook will include a new note on the word "phobia," advising writers to avoid the word in "political or social contexts," such as "Islamophobia" or "homophobia." The AP's announcement comes as a disappointment to George Weinberg, the New York pychotherapist who coined the term "homophobia" in 1965. He defends his word to Brooke as both an accurate descriptor and a valuable tool for the LGBT movement.

Do you have suggestions for a word to replace "homophobia" in the 21st century? Let us know! 

Vic Chesnutt - You Are Never Alone

Comments [14]

On The Media

An Apology for Reporter Edward Kennedy

Friday, May 11, 2012

This week Tom Curley, the president and CEO of the Associated Press, apologized on behalf of the AP for the way the organization handled the firing of a reporter named Edward Kennedy. In 1945, Kennedy broke a US government embargo and filed a story about the German surrender in Europe. Bob speaks with Curley about why he decided to apologize now, 67 years after Kennedy was dismissed.

Comments [1]

On The Media

The AP (Temporarily) Holds a Big Story

Friday, May 11, 2012

Early this week, the Associated Press broke the story that the US government had stymied an attempt by a Yemini Al-Qaeda group to blow-up a US bound plane. It was a huge scoop, but at the government’s request the AP sat on the story for several days. Bob speaks with AP reporter Matt Apuzzo about the decision to hold the story, and the decision to publish it.


Comments [3]

On The Media

The Associated Press in North Korea

Friday, April 13, 2012

The world’s media may have been invited for a rare peek into North Korea this week but one news organization was already there - the Associated Press.  After a year of negotiations the AP opened the first all format, full-time bureau in Pyongyang in January, the first western journalism outfit to ever do so.  Executive Editor and Senior Vice President of the Associated Press Kathleen Carroll talks to Bob about what it means to bring the AP’s journalistic standards to reporting in North Korea.

 

Smog - I'm New Here

Comments [3]

On The Media

The Web Has Become The World's Mood Ring

Friday, November 11, 2011

Analysts at the CIA's Open Source Center spend their days combing through the world's tweets, blogs and facebook pages in an attempt to determine the mood of people across the globe.  They say this type of "sentiment analysis" helps them predict events like the Egyptian revolution.  Brooke speaks with Associated Press intelligence reporter Kimberly Dozier.

Comments [1]