Bob Garfield

On The Media

Revenge Porn's Latest Frontier

Friday, December 02, 2011

Hunter Moore is the creator isanyoneup.com, an amateur pornography site with an insidious social networking component. Users submit naked photos of other people and include links to the naked person's social networking page, ensuring that the photos will be unmissable in their targets' Google results. Moore talks to Bob about his site and his lack of ethics.

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On The Media

Secrecy Bill Threatens South African Democracy—Or Not?

Friday, December 02, 2011

The Protection of State Information Bill has made it through the lower chamber of South Africa's ANC-controlled Parliament, causing alarm among journalists and high-profile South Africans including Nadine Gordimer, Desmond Tutu, and Nelson Mandela. While critics fear the bill's potential to turn back the clock on transparency and media freedom in the 17-year-old democracy, journalist Eusebius McKaiser trusts in the strength of the Constitutional Court to knock down this piece of legislation.

Deaf Center – Dial

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On The Media

Pulp Non-Fiction

Friday, November 25, 2011

For five scandal-ridden years in the mid 1950’s, Confidential was the most popular, pulpiest, dishiest, Hollywood-shaking gossip rag in the nation. And it insisted that its stories, no matter how sensational, be true. Confidential defied the studios, exposed the foibles of Hollywood brightest stars and laid the groundwork for our modern 24/7 celebrity culture. in an interview that originally aired in 2010, Henry Scott, author of the book Shocking True Story, tells Bob Confidential’s story.

 

Jerry Goldsmith - Badge of Honor

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On The Media

Was the SuperCommittee a Super Failure?

Friday, November 25, 2011

The Joint Select Committee on Deficit Spending failed to reach an agreement in time for its Thanksgiving week deadline.  The so-called "Supercommittee" of six Republicans and six Democrats was created last summer to cut the deficit by more than one trillion dollars, or else automatic cuts would be triggered.  Bob speaks to New York Magazine politics writer Jonathan Chait who says the Supercommittee wasn't a failure at all, it did exactly what it was designed to do.

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On The Media

The Love Triangle, Murder and Missing Head that Sparked a Tabloid War

Friday, November 25, 2011

In the summer of 1897, the story of a dismembered body and a sordid love triangle wasn't likely to dominate the papers. But William Randolph Hearst saw the story as an opportunity for his newly launched New York Evening Journal to beat out its major competition, Joseph Pulitzer's New York World: a tabloid war ensued.  In an interview that originally aired in July of 2011, Bob spoke with Paul Collins, author of The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime That Scandalized a City and Sparked the Tabloid Wars. Collins says that in their quest to cover the story, the papers employed tactics reminiscent of today's News of the World phone hacking scandal.

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On The Media

Proposing a Constitutional Amendment to End Corporate Personhood

Friday, November 18, 2011

Massachusetts congressman Jim McGovern, believing that there is too much corporate influence in politics, has proposed a drastic and most likely futile bill to attempt to amend the Consitution to exclude corporations as "people". Bob talks to Congressman McGovern about why he chose to take this step.

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On The Media

Arab Governments No Longer Ignoring Regional Atrocities

Friday, November 18, 2011

The regime of Syrian President Bashar Al Assad is becoming increasingly isolated.  Eight months into the Syrian uprising, with estimates of more than 3,500 people killed, the Arab League voted to suspend Syria's membership in the organization.  Bob speaks with Foreign Policy blogger Marc Lynch, who says the idea that Assad would lose legitimacy among fellow Arab leaders for killing his own people may seem obvious, but it is actually a revolutionary shift in the regional mentality.

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On The Media

Freedom Of Information Laws in India

Friday, November 18, 2011

India instituted a Right to Information law a few years ago that's very similar to the Freedom of Information Act in the US. The law has worked well as an anti-corruption tool but there's only problem. Some of the people who've used it have been killed afterwards. Bloomberg reporter Mejul Srivasta talks to Bob about how India is trying to protect its whistleblowers.

Tortoise - Gigantes (Mark Ernestus Version)

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On The Media

Parents Helping Kids Lie Online

Friday, November 04, 2011

The Terms of Service on sites like Facebook and Gmail prohibit anyone under the age of 13 from signing up to be in compliance with the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, which regulates how companies can collect data about users under 13. But a new study finds that a lot of parents are actually helping their kids cheat the system so they can access those sites.  Bob speaks with danah boyd, one of the authors of the study "Why Parents help their children lie to Facebook about age."

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On The Media

Public Radio Journalists and Political Expression

Friday, November 04, 2011

Last month, freelancer Caitlin Curran was dismissed from the WNYC/PRI show The Takeaway for participating in an Occupy Wall Street protest in Times Square. Curran talks to Bob about her dismissal.

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On The Media

The Vulnerability of Information Stored in the Cloud

Friday, October 28, 2011

The Stored Communications Act, passed 25 years ago this month, includes rules that make data stored on remote computers vulnerable to law enforcement subpoena without requiring a warrant. However, even though the law hasn't been changed by Congress, recent court decisions have made the government less likely to pursue this type of data without a warrant. Bob talks to Forbes privacy blogger Kashmir Hill about these developments.

Sun Airway - "Your Moon"

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On The Media

Is Transparency Always A Good Thing?

Friday, October 28, 2011

The "super committee" on deficit reduction is meeting in advance of their Thanksgiving deadline, and critics claim they have not been transparent enough about the progress of their negotiations.  Bob spoke with Matthew Yglesias of Think Progress and Donny Shaw of the Participatory Politics Foundation about the pros and cons of meeting behind closed doors.

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On The Media

State-owned Media in South Africa

Friday, October 21, 2011

Under Apartheid rule, the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) was notorious as a megaphone of the ruling National Party. Now with three major TV channels and several radio stations broadcasting in 11 languages, the SABC continues to dominate the broadcast media market. With new media legislation in the pipeline, some are accusing the ANC government of employing the Apartheid-era control tactics. Bob talks to a smattering of journalists and media watchdogs on the ground in Johannesburg.

Sam Amidon – "Prodigal Son"

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On The Media

South Africa's Uncertain Political Future

Friday, October 21, 2011

Seventeen years after the fall of apartheid, South Africa's ANC government has failed to provide basic services to the people of South Africa. Andrew Meldrum of GlobalPost reported from southern Africa for almost three decades. He says he's afraid that the rhetoric of a young firebrand Julius Malema may speak to people's discontent and help usher in an era of real instability in South Africa. 

Blockhead – "Attack the Doctor"

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On The Media

Is Warrantless GPS Tracking Legal?

Friday, October 08, 2010

If the police want to search your house, they need a warrant. If they want to follow you around in an unmarked car, they don't. But what about GPS technology? It's highly accurate, virtually effortless and law enforcement are using it like never before. But the courts are divided on the legality of GPS and the issue seems destined for the Supreme Court. Law professor Orin Kerr explains.

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