Censorship

On The Media

Indian State Outlaws "Objectionable Content," Will Start Arresting People for Precrime

Monday, August 25, 2014

The Indian state of Karnataka has not only outlawed sharing "malicious or misleading images" online, it can also arrest citizens for breaking the law before they actually commit a crime.
Read More

Comment

On The Media

Muzzled

Friday, April 11, 2014

Every year on or around April 13th, Thomas Jefferson’s birthday, the Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression, has celebrated by issuing Jefferson Muzzles. These are booby prizes, awarded to individuals and institutions who act against Mr. Jefferson's admonition that freedom of speech  “cannot be limited without being lost.” Bob speaks with Josh Wheeler, director of the Center, about this year's chief offenders.

Comments [1]

On The Media

Banning The Other N-Word?

Friday, January 24, 2014

The Israeli Knesset has given preliminary approval to a bill that would criminalize use of the word Nazi, and Nazi symbols, except in certain educational or artistic contexts. Violators could face fines as high as twenty-nine thousand dollars, and up to six months in jail. Backers of the bill seek to prevent disrespect of the Holocaust that results when Nazis are invoked casually, whether in political invective or adolescent insults. Brooke talks with linguistic anthropologist Paja Faudree about this legislative attempt to control the use of language.

The Bees - Winter Rose

Comments [7]

On The Media

Outsmarting the Iranian Filternet

Friday, June 07, 2013

One way the Iranian government has been trying to ensure a smooth election is by slowing down the internet to a nearly unusable speed. This is in addition to blocking Iranians from Facebook, Twitter, and thousands of international news sites. Brooke talks to an Nariman Gharib, an Iranian expatriate who connects with people still in Iran to help them find workarounds to the Iranian “filternet.”

Comment

On The Media

Censorship in the Largest Democracy in the World

Friday, January 11, 2013

The rape and murder of a young woman in India has brought protesters to the streets. Both the national and international press have closely followed the public outrage and tepid response from government officials, turning out in full force to see the accused men in court on Monday. The swarm of journalists prompted a local judge to not only ban reporters from the courtroom, but also prohibit anyone from covering the trial. Brooke talks with New York Times reporter Niharika Mandhana about the repercussions of the ban, and about why the government would keep the trial off the public record. 

Tinariwen - Walla Illa

Comments [1]

On The Media

Mapping Gun Owners, International Journalists Fight Censorship, and More

Friday, January 11, 2013

The ATF's desire for a central database of gun transactions, journalists fight for the right to report on India's rape trial, an interview with 56 Up director Michael Apted, and Chinese journalists strike after the government censored an Op-Ed.

On The Media

Al Jazeera and the Qatari Government's Editorial Influence

Friday, January 11, 2013

In December, Al Jazeera Berlin correspondent Aktham Suliman left the news outlet, saying he felt its primary funder, the Qatari government, exerted too much influence over Al Jazeera's coverage. Suliman is just the latest in a string of resignations from Al Jazeera in protest of editorial interference. In an interview from August of last year, Bob talks to blogger and political commentator Sultan Al Qassemi about what he sees as the problems with Al Jazeera's coverage of ongoing fighting in Syria.

Yo La Tengo - I'll Be Around

Comments [2]

On The Media

A Look Inside China Central Television

Friday, November 09, 2012

As China's only national TV network, CCTV isn't just the domestic mouthpiece of the Chinese Communist Party; it's also a global for-profit corporation with over 1.2 billion viewers worldwide. Ying Zhu, a professor at the City University of New York, sits down with Brooke to talk about her groundbreaking new book, Two Billion Eyes: The Story of China Central Television.

B. Fleischmann - Lemmings

Comment

On The Media

Chinese Censorship Gets Complicated

Friday, June 01, 2012

Chinese censorship is nothing new. But recently the relationship between censor and dissident has grown more complicated as the government comes to accept that social media is no longer something it can simply take away from Chinese citizens. Brooke speaks with Slate's Jacob Weisberg, who recently traveled to China and spoke with some tech-savvy new dissidents.

 

Lit - My Own Worst Enemy

Comment

On The Media

Iran's "Halal Internet"

Friday, March 02, 2012

The Iranian government is set to launch a "Halal Internet" this spring as an alternative to the greater World Wide Web. Bob speaks to Fast Company reporter Neal Ungerleider about the most ambitious attempt by a government to censor the internet since China's "Great Firewall."

 

Quantic and His Combo Barbaro - Cancao Do Deserto

Comment

On The Media

Internet Censorship From Around the Globe

Friday, January 27, 2012

Last week, public outrage forced congress to table some bills backed by Hollywood lobbyists that would have barred access to sites accused of piracy. But Hollywood’s influence extends well beyond the US Congress. Bob talks to Rainey Reitman of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which has created a website called Global Chokepoints that tracks pending or existing legislation worldwide (often pushed by the US and Hollywood) that would kick people or websites off the internet.

Dan Bull & Friends - SOPA Cabana

Comments [2]

On The Media

Two Science Journals Asked to Redact an Article

Friday, December 23, 2011

This week the government advisory board overseen by the National Institutes of Health asked two science journals to redact details of a new study about the bird flu virus. The government’s worried that, in the wrong hands, the research could be used to cause a pandemic. Bruce Alberts, the editor of Science talks to Bob about why he’s complying – for now – with the government’s request.

tUnE-yArDs - Doorstep

Comment

On The Media

The Dreyfus Affair and Censorship

Friday, December 09, 2011

When early film legend George Méliès made 1899's L'Affair Dreyfus, a movie about the controversial Dreyfus Affair in France, it inspired riots. The topic was so dangerous for so long in France that the film was banned for decades and wasn't aired again in the country until the 1970s. Brooke speaks with writer Susan Daitch, who wrote Paper Conspiracies, a novel about the impact of the Dreyfus Affair and the Méliès film. 

Comments [2]