China

On The Media

Negotiating Access and Accuracy in China

Friday, November 22, 2013

Recent resignations at Bloomberg News and leaks about the company's reporting in China have raised questions about what concessions news organizations choose — or are forced to make — to sustain expensive foreign reporting. The New York Times Edward Wong talks to Bob about why financial reporting has become the biggest threat in the eyes of China's ruling party, and why Western media might have less reason to be worried than they think.

Bonobo - Sapphire

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On The Media

Apple Killed An App That Let Chinese People Circumvent the Great Firewall

Monday, October 07, 2013

OpenDoor is an app that lets you anonymously surf the internet on your iPhone or iPad. A third of OpenDoor's sales have historically come from China, where internet freedom's restricted and most people access the net on mobile. That is until this past summer, when Apple pulled Open Door from the app store after the Chinese government complained. 

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On The Media

A Retweet Can Send You to Jail, A Like is Free Speech

Thursday, September 19, 2013

So here's two strange stories from opposite sides of the world.

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On The Media

Reporting Global Health Epidemics In A Wired World

Friday, April 12, 2013

In China, a new form of avian flu, called H7N9, has killed 10 people and infected an additional 28.  China’s gotten plaudits from the global health community for its transparency and responsiveness to this outbreak. But that's partly because many remember how China lied about SARS in 2002, a decision that killed hundreds. Public health reporter Maryn McKenna talks to Bob about what the standards are for reporting health epidemics in a wired world. 

 

Bonobo - Cirrus

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On The Media

Rape coverage after Steubenville, the false promise of the personal finance industry and more.

Friday, March 22, 2013

How the media is covering yet another high school rape case after Steubenville, how personal finance luminaries lead the public astray, and an infamous hacker threatens to tarnish the public image of all hackers.

 

On The Media

Cracking Chinese Skype's Surveillance Code

Friday, March 22, 2013

We have known for years that certain words and phrases can get Chinese internet users flagged for surveillance by the Chinese government. Now a computer science graduate student at the University of New Mexico has compiled an extensive list of the sometimes surprising words and phrases that put Chinese internet censors on alert. Bob talks to Jeffrey Knockel about how he cracked the code of the Chinese version of Skype to compile the list.

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On The Media

Microsoft and the Global Network Initiative

Friday, March 22, 2013

China's surveillance of Skype is not particularly surprising. What is surprising is that Skype owner Microsoft is a founding member of the Global Network Initiative, an anti-internet censorship and pro-privacy organization. Bob speaks to Ethan Zuckerman, director of MIT's Center for Civic Media, about the Global Network Initiative and its apparent shortcomings.

 

Four Tet - Pinnacles

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On The Media

Mapping Gun Owners, International Journalists Fight Censorship, and More

Friday, January 11, 2013

The ATF's desire for a central database of gun transactions, journalists fight for the right to report on India's rape trial, an interview with 56 Up director Michael Apted, and Chinese journalists strike after the government censored an Op-Ed.

On The Media

A Look Inside China Central Television

Friday, November 09, 2012

As China's only national TV network, CCTV isn't just the domestic mouthpiece of the Chinese Communist Party; it's also a global for-profit corporation with over 1.2 billion viewers worldwide. Ying Zhu, a professor at the City University of New York, sits down with Brooke to talk about her groundbreaking new book, Two Billion Eyes: The Story of China Central Television.

B. Fleischmann - Lemmings

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On The Media

China's Fake Facebooks

Friday, October 26, 2012

Facebook is blocked in China –but that hasn’t prevented homegrown Facebook knock-off sites from sprouting. And even on China’s fake Facebooks,  real conversations about politics and culture are occurring every day. Jeremy Goldkorn, who monitors Chinese media at his website, talks to Bob about life on China's fake Facebooks.

Tito Nieves - I Like It Like That

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On The Media

Hollywood Goes to China

Friday, June 01, 2012

China is increasing its number of movie theatres and the number of American films that can be shown in them.  And China is already the second largest market for American films in the world.  So Hollywood is anxious to take full advantage of China’s potential and is busy making, and changing, its fare to appease the notoriously sensitive Chinese government.  Bob talks to USC professor Stanley Rosen about what Hollywood's appeasement of China looks like at the movies.

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On The Media

Chinese Censorship Gets Complicated

Friday, June 01, 2012

Chinese censorship is nothing new. But recently the relationship between censor and dissident has grown more complicated as the government comes to accept that social media is no longer something it can simply take away from Chinese citizens. Brooke speaks with Slate's Jacob Weisberg, who recently traveled to China and spoke with some tech-savvy new dissidents.

 

Lit - My Own Worst Enemy

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On The Media

China's Fake Facebooks

Friday, February 03, 2012

Facebook is blocked in China –but that hasn’t prevented homegrown Facebook knock-off sites from sprouting. And even on China’s fake Facebooks,  real conversations about politics and culture are occurring every day. Jeremy Goldkorn, who monitors Chinese media at his website, talks to Bob about life on China's fake Facebooks.

Tito Nieves - I Like It Like That

Right now, Facebook is blocked in China –but that hasn’t prevented Facebook-like social media from surfacing. 

And even on China’s fake Facebooks – real conversations about real things have occurred. They have been made possible, in part, because of the protective anonymity of the Internet. Recently, though, the Chinese government has taken Zuckerbergian steps to force users to register to use the sites, making themselves known, if not to everyone, than at least to the government. Jeremy Goldkorn, monitors Chinese Media on his website danwei dot com. He says Facebook and Twitter were blocked in China because of street protests, both within China, and also very far away.

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On The Media

"Whether you believe it or not, I believe it."

Friday, July 29, 2011

Two high speed trains collided on a bridge in China recently, causing six carriages to fall off the tracks and onto a farm below. Immediately, passengers began using a Twitter-esque site to describe what happened. The Chinese government has gone to lengths to try to cover up the severity of the accident.  Some even believe they tried to literally bury one of the carriages with dirt.  Danwei.org founder Jeremy Goldkorn talks with Bob from Beijing.  Goldkorn says, so far, social media has beaten back government propaganda.

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