Free Speech

On The Media

Combating "Bad" Speech With More Speech

Friday, January 24, 2014

The blogger Crystal Cox has also targeted First Amendment lawyer Marc Randazza, his wife, and their toddler. Bob spoke to Randazza in the Spring of 2012 about how Cox's actions were testing his free speech values. Since then, Randazza decided to take her to court and won. (He told us this week that his legal strategy had nothing to do with the content of Cox's speech and were instead based on domain law. His court arguments are available upon request, for free, if you ever find yourself in Cox's cross hairs). Randazza also blogs at The Legal Satyricon.

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On The Media

A Blogger's First Amendment Rights - and Responsibilities

Friday, January 24, 2014

A federal court ruled last week that a blogger who had lost a defamation suit in 2011 should have the same free speech protections as a traditional journalist, and as everyone else who publishes online. The blogger is Crystal Cox, who is notorious for creating domain names and blog posts tarring the online reputations of her targets and then offering to fix the problem for a price. Bob speaks to Ellyn Angelotti of the Poynter Institute about what the decision from the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals means for First Amendment protections online, and whether it matters that Cox is the defendant.

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On The Media

A Retweet Can Send You to Jail, A Like is Free Speech

Thursday, September 19, 2013

So here's two strange stories from opposite sides of the world.

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On The Media

'The Deciders'

Friday, May 31, 2013

There's a small group of men and women - "Deciders" - at big tech companies like Google, Facebook, and Twitter who make decisions everyday about what offensive speech is pulled from their sites. The huge scale of those sites gives those Deciders enormous influence over the state of free speech on the web. Bob speaks with George Washington University Law professor Jeffrey Rosen, who wrote about the Deciders and their many decisions in The New Republic.

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On The Media

Tweet That Your Boss is an A**hole, and Get Away With It

Friday, January 25, 2013

Since 1935, the National Labor Relations Act has protected the right of private-sector employees to discuss workplace conditions. But as conversations shift from the break room to the sphere of social media, regulators are facing new challenges in distinguishing protected speech from "mere griping." Bob talks with Lafe Solomon, General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board, about what can and can't be tweeted about the workplace.

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On The Media

A New (Troubling) Speech Law in Libya

Friday, May 18, 2012

With the first Libyan elections in 40 years just a month away, the shadow of the Gaddafi regime looms large. The National Transitional Council (which holds power in Libya until those elections) recently passed a law that criminalizes glorifying Gaddafi as well as offending the revolution. Bob speaks with Libya Herald editor Sami Zaptia about the implications of the law for speech in Libya.

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On The Media

Political Satire in South Africa

Friday, December 30, 2011

Pieter-Dirk Uys and Jonathan Shapiro are satirists with different mediums, but a similar mission. Shapiro is a political cartoonist who publishes under the name Zapiro. Uys is a performer whose character Evita Bezuidenhout is billed as the most famous white woman in South Africa. Bob talks to the two about their work under apartheid, when their criticism of the government was as constant as it was ruthless.

Vusi Mahlasela - Two Birds

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On The Media

Political Satire in South Africa

Friday, October 21, 2011

Pieter-Dirk Uys and Jonathan Shapiro are satirists with different mediums, but a similar mission. Shapiro is a political cartoonist who publishes under the name Zapiro. Uys is a performer whose character Evita Bezuidenhout is billed as the most famous white woman in South Africa. Bob talks to the two about their work under apartheid, when their criticism of the government was as constant as it was ruthless.

Vusi Mahlasela – "Two Birds"

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