Health

On The Media

Case Closed

Friday, April 04, 2014

A new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) not only presents dire evidence of global warming's impact, it also offers a different narrative about who is at risk, putting humans at the center of the story. Brooke talks with science journalist Cristine Russell about the IPCC's media-ready case.

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On The Media

Taking Healthcare Literally

Friday, March 28, 2014

Bob speaks with Yurina Melara who covers public health for the Los Angeles-based La Opinion, the largest Spanish language daily in the US. She says that telling the 38 million Spanish-speaking Americans about Obamacare is only half the battle. The other half is making sure they understand what it is...beginning with the literal translation of “health care.”

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On The Media

Obamacare In Spanish, Cartographers vs. The World, and More

Friday, March 28, 2014

The Obamacare advertising blitz tries to reach the young and uninsured, the annexation of Crimea creates a dilemma for map makers, and the history of those ubiquitous online quizzes. 

On The Media

New Frontiers in Child Porn Law

Friday, January 24, 2014

The Supreme Court is weighing how much defendants convicted of possessing images of child pornography should have to pay in restitution to the victims depicted in those images. The case involves a woman known as “Amy,” whose uncle raped her when she was a young girl and circulated photographs of the abuse online. He eventually went to jail, but those photos became among the most widely viewed child porn in the world. Karen Duffin reports on Amy’s quest for restitution.

 

Middlesex Times

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On The Media

Of Course You Can Tweet About Having Cancer

Monday, January 13, 2014

UPDATE: 12:37PM. Wow, The Guardian pulled the columnCached copy is here. It could've been because of the content, or because of this. Guardian's notice just says that it was "inconsistent with the Guardian editorial code."

 

People are angry about a Guardian op-ed by Emma Keller titled: “Forget funeral selfies. What are the ethics of tweeting a terminal illness?”

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On The Media

Bogus "Blue Monday"

Friday, January 10, 2014

Every year at this time, the media report on the phenomenon of "Blue Monday," the day researchers have determined is purportedly the most depressing of the year. This year, the sad day fell on January 6th. Bob speaks with Dr. Ben Goldacre, who writes the Bad Science blog, about how "Blue Monday" is just a pseudoscientific media myth started by a public relations company.

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On The Media

The Obamacare Horror Story

Friday, January 10, 2014

During the tumultuous roll-out of the Affordable Care Act, the media struggled to find stories of people who had successfully bought insurance through healthcare.gov, and many landed on sources that turned out to be unreliable. But now, another dubious narrative is all the rage: the Obamacare horror story. Bob talks to health policy writer Maggie Mahar, who is very suspicious of the nightmarish tales reported in the media. 

 

 

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On The Media

Meet the Pot Editor

Friday, December 13, 2013

On January 1st, Colorado will be the first state to allow recreational marijuana use. To cover the story The Denver Post has hired a full-time pot editor to run a dedicated pot page. Ricardo Baca is his name and despite being a longtime, experienced journalist, he's spent the last few weeks enduring joke after joke about his new position. Bob talks with Baca about the new gig and all the jokes.

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On The Media

High Times for 'High Times'

Friday, December 13, 2013

Unlike The Denver Post, High Times is not a new comer to the marijuana game, having covered the beat for 39 years. Bob talks with High Times editor-in-chief Chris Simunek about how the magazine reports on the world of marijuana, and whether pot coverage going mainstream will change High Times. 

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On The Media

Battling Messages on Obamacare

Friday, September 27, 2013

The next phase of the Affordable Care Act goes into effect next week with the opening of new health insurance exchanges. Brooke and Bob take a look at the messaging war, from the conservative ads advising people to "opt out," to the Obama administration's push to educate people about the new law, and the media's role in covering this protracted battle.

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On The Media

Obamacare Messaging, Fake Reviews Online, and More

Friday, September 27, 2013

Conflicting messaging on Obamacare, why people leave fake reviews online, and India's effort to create the largest national ID program in history.

On The Media

Battling Bad Science

Friday, July 05, 2013

Stories about new innovations in health appear almost daily in the media, but the claims are frequently overblown, misleading, or completely false. In a TED talk from July, 2011, journalist Ben Goldacre talks about how to spot and avoid bad science.

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On The Media

Why are Articles Retracted? Ask Retraction Watch

Friday, July 05, 2013

Ivan Oransky is a doctor and journalist and founder, along with Adam Marcus, of a blog called Retraction Watch. The site monitors scientific journals and investigates why articles were retracted. Brooke talks with Oransky, who says that since he and Marcus started the site in 2010 retractions have become more and more frequent.

 

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On The Media

Seth Mnookin on The Panic Virus

Friday, July 05, 2013

There is a scientific consensus that the oft-claimed link between vaccines and Autism simply doesn't exist. And yet, after a decade of no convincing evidence of a link many in the public are still scared and vaccination rates are down. In an interview that originally aired in 2011, Bob speaks to Seth Mnookin, author of The Panic Virus, about why it’s so hard to dislodge misinformation and fear.

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On The Media

Portraying Medicine: The Perils of Painting By Numbers

Friday, July 05, 2013

A special hour of stories about reporting on medical science. The misreporting of the effect of vaccines on autism, tracking retractions in medical journals, and a century old hoax that went uncorrected for forty years.

On The Media

Who Owns Data From Inside Your Body?

Friday, January 20, 2012

If you have an implanted medical device that can collect data in your body, who owns that information?  There doesn't appear to be a clear answer to the question.  Brooke speaks to Hugo Campos, a patient advocate and founder of the ICD User Group, about his unsuccessful attempt to obtain the data collected by his own implanted defibrillator.

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On The Media

Two Science Journals Asked to Redact an Article

Friday, December 23, 2011

This week the government advisory board overseen by the National Institutes of Health asked two science journals to redact details of a new study about the bird flu virus. The government’s worried that, in the wrong hands, the research could be used to cause a pandemic. Bruce Alberts, the editor of Science talks to Bob about why he’s complying – for now – with the government’s request.

tUnE-yArDs - Doorstep

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On The Media

The Loss of a Valuable Journalistic Tool

Friday, October 07, 2011

For years, health care reporters have employed a government database called the National Practitioner Data Bank, containing information on malpractice payouts.  The public version of the database hides the names of physicians, but after a reporter was able to identify an anonymous doctor, the public database was taken offline.  Bob talks to Charles Ornstein of the Association of Health Care Journalists about why the database is important, and attempts by journalists to regain access to it.

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