Health

On The Media

The Con Artists Take the Media

Friday, December 05, 2014

On how con artists can seize the media's power to make names for themselves.

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On The Media

A Liberian Journalist on Ebola

Friday, October 10, 2014

Liberian journalist and editor Rodney Sieh on covering the story that could cost you your life.     

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On The Media

Tweeting Shark Week

Friday, August 15, 2014

Marine Biologist David Shiffman was enthralled by "Shark Week" almost from its start in 1988. Bob talks with Shiffman about how, lately, he's become a "Shark Week" critic on Twitter. 

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On The Media

Truvada

Friday, July 18, 2014

Truvada is a drug that, taken daily, has been show to prevent HIV infection by as much as 99 percent. Like the polio vaccine, or like the birth control pill, it's a medical breakthrough worthy of massive coverage. Why hasn't there been? Brooke speaks to Rich Juzwiak, a Gawker staff writer, about the drug and what’s holding it back in the media.

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On The Media

A Breakthrough HIV Drug, Chronicling Gun Violence, and SIMS

Friday, July 18, 2014

How a pill called Truvada is changing the face of gay sex, reporting on every gun death in America, and why Central Americans continue to make the perilous journey north. 

On The Media

Jonesin'

Friday, May 23, 2014

Nicorette is very bad  at communicating with their customers, many of whom are woefully dependent on their products. A local supply problem led one desperate user on an international online journey.

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On The Media

Health Inspectors Are Using Yelp Reviews To Target Dirty Restaurants

Friday, May 23, 2014

The Center for Disease Control says that NYC health inspectors have been using Yelp reviews to ferret out local restaurants which were giving patrons food poisoning. 

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On The Media

The Questions You Need to Ask About Any Health Story

Friday, May 23, 2014

Health news reporting is plagued by incredulity, false correlation, and general public confusion. Gary Schwitzer has devoted his life to reviewing how health news is reported, and, more often than not, mis-reported. Bob speaks to Schwitzer about his new study, “A Guide to Reading Health Care News Stories,” and the impact of bad health reporting.

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On The Media

Battling Bad Science

Friday, May 02, 2014

Stories about new innovations in health appear almost daily in the media, but the claims are frequently overblown, misleading, or completely false. In a TED talk from July, 2011, journalist Ben Goldacre talks about how to spot and avoid bad science.

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On The Media

Seth Mnookin on the Panic Virus

Friday, May 02, 2014

There is a scientific consensus that the oft-claimed link between vaccines and Autism simply doesn't exist. And yet, after a decade of no convincing evidence of a link many in the public are still scared and vaccination rates are down. In an interview that originally aired in 2011, Bob speaks to Seth Mnookin, author of The Panic Virus, about why it's so hard to dislodge misinformation and fear.

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On The Media

Retraction Watch Revisited

Friday, May 02, 2014

Ivan Oransky is a doctor and journalist and founder, along with Adam Marcus, of a blog called Retraction Watch. The site monitors scientific journals and investigates why articles were retracted. Brooke talks with Oransky, who says that since he and Marcus started the site in 2010 retractions have become more and more frequent.

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On The Media

Portraying Medicine: The Perils of Painting By Numbers

Friday, May 02, 2014

A special hour of stories about reporting on medical science. The misreporting of the effect of vaccines on autism, tracking retractions in medical journals, and a century old hoax that went uncorrected for forty years.

On The Media

Case Closed

Friday, April 04, 2014

A new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) not only presents dire evidence of global warming's impact, it also offers a different narrative about who is at risk, putting humans at the center of the story. Brooke talks with science journalist Cristine Russell about the IPCC's media-ready case.

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On The Media

Taking Healthcare Literally

Friday, March 28, 2014

Bob speaks with Yurina Melara who covers public health for the Los Angeles-based La Opinion, the largest Spanish language daily in the US. She says that telling the 38 million Spanish-speaking Americans about Obamacare is only half the battle. The other half is making sure they understand what it is...beginning with the literal translation of “health care.”

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On The Media

Obamacare In Spanish, Cartographers vs. The World, and More

Friday, March 28, 2014

The Obamacare advertising blitz tries to reach the young and uninsured, the annexation of Crimea creates a dilemma for map makers, and the history of those ubiquitous online quizzes. 

On The Media

Up in...Vapor?

Friday, January 31, 2014

It’s been 50 years since the Surgeon General linked tobacco smoking with cancer and other diseases. Amid widespread bans on public smoking, jurisdictions such as New York City are expanding the bans to include fake smoke -- the battery-heated glycol vapor produced by e-cigarettes. Former New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn defended the city’s new restrictions, saying e-cigarettes “normalize” the appearance of lighting up. Bob speaks to Amy Fairchild, a professor of sociomedical sciences at Columbia University, to ask if you can really ban an image?

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On The Media

New Frontiers in Child Porn Law

Friday, January 24, 2014

The Supreme Court is weighing how much defendants convicted of possessing images of child pornography should have to pay in restitution to the victims depicted in those images. The case involves a woman known as “Amy,” whose uncle raped her when she was a young girl and circulated photographs of the abuse online. He eventually went to jail, but those photos became among the most widely viewed child porn in the world. Karen Duffin reports on Amy’s quest for restitution.

 

Middlesex Times

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On The Media

Of Course You Can Tweet About Having Cancer

Monday, January 13, 2014

UPDATE: 12:37PM. Wow, The Guardian pulled the columnCached copy is here. It could've been because of the content, or because of this. Guardian's notice just says that it was "inconsistent with the Guardian editorial code."

 

People are angry about a Guardian op-ed by Emma Keller titled: “Forget funeral selfies. What are the ethics of tweeting a terminal illness?”

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On The Media

The Obamacare Horror Story

Friday, January 10, 2014

During the tumultuous roll-out of the Affordable Care Act, the media struggled to find stories of people who had successfully bought insurance through healthcare.gov, and many landed on sources that turned out to be unreliable. But now, another dubious narrative is all the rage: the Obamacare horror story. Bob talks to health policy writer Maggie Mahar, who is very suspicious of the nightmarish tales reported in the media. 

 

 

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On The Media

Bogus "Blue Monday"

Friday, January 10, 2014

Every year at this time, the media report on the phenomenon of "Blue Monday," the day researchers have determined is purportedly the most depressing of the year. This year, the sad day fell on January 6th. Bob speaks with Dr. Ben Goldacre, who writes the Bad Science blog, about how "Blue Monday" is just a pseudoscientific media myth started by a public relations company.

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