History

On The Media

The Obit Beat

Friday, September 12, 2014

There’s a saying from the early days of newspapers that goes “everyone gets to be in the paper twice: when they’re born, and when they die.”

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On The Media

The Labor Beat

Friday, September 12, 2014

As the power of the unions declined, so did the number of labor reporters covering them.

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On The Media

Rod Blagojevich Meets His Match

Friday, September 12, 2014

How one reporter was in the right place at the right time to uncover the story of a lifetime.

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On The Media

The State House Beat

Friday, September 12, 2014

Two-thirds of audited daily papers do not assign a single reporter to cover the State House. 

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On The Media

The History of Beats

Friday, September 12, 2014

You’d think that beat reporting has been fundamental to journalism since the birth of the business. But beats didn’t really take off until a little over a century ago.

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On The Media

TLDR #15 - Internet Time

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

In 1998 Swatch tried to completely reinvent our concept of time. Swatch Internet Time (or .beat time) would have been a new way to conceive of moments.
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On The Media

Gavel to Gavel

Friday, August 15, 2014

Jeremiah Zagar, director of the documentary "Captivated: The Trials of Pamela Smart," speaks with Brooke about the role the media played in first trial to be covered gavel-to gavel. 

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On The Media

9/11 Enters the Realm of Museum

Friday, May 23, 2014

The opening of the 9/11 Memorial Museum on the footprint of the twin towers marks a new phase of remembering the events of that day and their ongoing impact. Brooke and producer Meara Sharma visit the museum on opening day and talk to designer Jake Barton about creating an experience for visitors that tells a story as well as pays tribute.

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On The Media

TLDR #24 - The Million Dollar Homepage

Monday, May 05, 2014

In 2005, Alex Tew was a 21-year-old entrepreneur who wanted to make a million dollars before college. The only problem was he had literally nothing of value to sell. So he made The Million Dollar Homepage -- possibly the most ambitiously garish website ever created.

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On The Media

#24 - The Million Dollar Homepage

Thursday, May 01, 2014

In 2005, Alex Tew was a high school entrepreneur who wanted to make a million dollars before college. So he created perhaps the most ridiculous website ever to grace the Internet.

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On The Media

Rewriting History

Friday, February 21, 2014

Historical understanding doesn’t always move ahead. Sometimes it slips backwards. Case in point: In 2012, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of official US involvement in Vietnam, the Pentagon quietly launched VietnamWar50th.com. Bob talks to historian Nick Turse, the author of Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam, who noticed that the website’s version of the war seems stuck in the past, reasserting misinformation long since debunked by journalists, historians, and the government’s own Pentagon papers.

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On The Media

The Current State of Ownership

Friday, December 27, 2013

Brooke examines the current arguments over ownership and intellectual property with the help of a chair that collapses after just eight uses.

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On The Media

The Journalist Behind Jackie Robinson

Friday, November 29, 2013

Throughout the more than six-decade celebration of Jackie Robinson's desegregation of baseball, the journalist who brought Robinson's story to the world has remained unknown. In an interview that originally aired in May, Brooke talks to Los Angeles Times sports writer Bill Plashcke, who recently penned a portrait of writer Wendell Smith, who helped secure Robinson's place in American history. 

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On The Media

The Forgotten Network

Friday, August 09, 2013

Television viewers under a certain age think of the big three broadcast networks as having existed since the dawn of time. A misconception, of course - but largely because of what it omits. In TV's earliest days, there was also the DuMont Network, a pioneering enterprise that aired some of its era's most popular programs. Bob talks history with David Weinstein, author of book that chronicles the rise and fall of DuMont.

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On The Media

Creation of the Media

Friday, August 09, 2013

It's often been observed that technological innovations are the primary force driving the evolution of the mass media. But make your way through the 402 pages Paul Starr's book The Creation of the Media, and that notion will be left in dust - along with many other common assumptions. In the book, Starr argues that the government has played a much more fundamental role in the growth of the American media than is commonly thought. He discusses his research with Brooke.

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On The Media

The Great Newspaper Strike of 1962-1963

Friday, August 09, 2013

Fifty years ago, 17,000 New York City newspaper workers went on strike, shuttering the city's seven daily papers for 114 days. Rooted in fears about new "cold type" printing technology, the strike ended up devastating the city's newspaper culture and launching the careers of a new generation of writers including Tom Wolfe, Gay Talese, and Nora Ephron. Vanity Fair contributor Scott Sherman talks with Bob about the strike and its legacy.

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On The Media

How Threatening Was Domestic Propaganda?

Friday, July 19, 2013

The Smith-Mundt Modernization Act goes into effect this month, lifting prior domestic broadcast bans on U.S. propaganda. Bob talks to historian Thomas Fleming, author of The Illusion of Victory: America in World War One, about how powerful domestic propaganda was in the past, and how unlikely it is to have much impact today.

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On The Media

Conservative Bloggers Vindicated, Advice for Leakers, and More

Friday, May 17, 2013

Some vindication for conservative bloggers in the IRS scandal, advice for sources after the AP call-record seizure, the Bloomberg Terminal scandal, and what the people thought the newspaper industry would look like in the future.

On The Media

The Journalist Behind Jackie Robinson

Friday, May 03, 2013

Throughout the more than six-decade celebration of Jackie Robinson's desegregation of baseball, the journalist who brought Robinson's story to the world has remained unknown. Brooke talks to Los Angeles Times sports writer Bill Plashcke, who recently penned a portrait of writer Wendell Smith, who helped secure Robinson's place in American history. 

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On The Media

Pioneers of the "Soft Sell"

Friday, April 05, 2013

On Sunday, the critically acclaimed AMC series Mad Men launches its sixth season. On Mad Men we see admen scrambling to match their ads to a new era - the 1960's. But in 1955, one real adman saw the future of advertising and it was funny. WNYC’s Sara Fishko tells the story of the pioneers of the "soft sell."

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