Hoax

On The Media

The Best, Most Inaccurate Twitter Pic Account Around

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

A few weeks ago, we did a TLDR episode about the general inaccuracy of those "amazing pics" accounts, which frequently post photoshopped, poorly sourced, unattributed photos.

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On The Media

Why We Should Ban All Parody Twitter Accounts (And Why They're Never Going Away)

Friday, February 28, 2014

If it exists, there will eventually be a parody Twitter account for it.

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On The Media

Piltdown at 100: A Look Back on Science's Biggest Hoax

Friday, July 05, 2013

A hundred years ago, a human-like skull and ape-like jaw were presented at a special meeting of the Geological Society in London. The so-called "Piltdown Man" became widely accepted as a crucial link in the human evolutionary chain; crucial, that is, until 1953, when the bones were exposed as a total hoax. In an interview from December of last year, Nova Senior Science Editor Evan Hadingham talks to Brooke about this tantalizing example of "scientific skullduggery." 

 

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On The Media

The Strangest Hoax in Modern Sports History

Friday, January 18, 2013

Until this week, Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te'o was famous not just for his on-field skills but for his compelling backstory, which included the tragic death of his girlfriend. This week, the sports blog Deadspin exposed that story as a massive hoax, although it is still unclear what, if any, participation Te'o had in the lie. Bob and Brooke delve into the myth and consider how it snuck by the national media. 

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On The Media

Piltdown at 100: A Look Back on Science's Biggest Hoax

Friday, December 14, 2012

A hundred years ago this week, a human-like skull and ape-like jaw were presented at a special meeting of the Geological Society in London. The so-called "Piltdown Man" became widely accepted as a crucial link in the human evolutionary chain; crucial, that is, until 1953, when the bones were exposed as a total hoax. Nova Senior Science Editor Evan Hadingham talks to Brooke about this tantalizing example of "scientific skullduggery." 

Califone - Lunar H

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