Idea Explorer

On The Media

May 2, 2008

Friday, May 02, 2008

Show Summary: the women of the Fundamentalist Church of Latter Day Saints fight back; segregated search engines; and a look back on the history of LSD.

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On The Media

Search is the New Black

Friday, May 02, 2008

Rushmore Drive is a new search engine designed to return results targeted to black people. CEO Johnny Taylor explains why segregated search makes sense and web entrepreneur Omar Wasow gives a status report on the state of the black internet.

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On The Media

Acid Reflux

Friday, May 02, 2008

65 years ago, Dr. Albert Hofmann embarked on the first intentional acid trip, when he ingested 250 µg and set out from his lab on a bicycle. On the occasion of Hofmann’s death this week, we rerun this interview with Acid Dreams author Martin ...

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On The Media

Correction and Letters

Friday, May 02, 2008

Brooke and Bob read a few of your letters and comments.

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On The Media

Sex, Drugs, and Video Games

Friday, May 02, 2008

This week's release of Grand Theft Auto IV provoked a frenzy of media coverage heralding the game's design, touting the record-breaking sales and of course, examining the threat the game poses to our children. But Lawrence Kutner has authored a new book suggesting violent video ...

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On The Media

Dialing for Dollars

Friday, April 25, 2008

From South Africa to Bangladesh to the Philippines, cell phones are dramatically changing the way people in developing countries conduct business and receive healthcare. As Sara Corbett reported in The New York Times Magazine, the phone is a transformational technology.

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On The Media

Cooking the Books

Friday, April 25, 2008

To get a read on the vital signs of our increasingly shaky economy, media turn to those all-important stats: unemployment, consumer price index, GDP. But Kevin Phillips, political and economic commentator, says that for decades administrations have been altering the definitions of those stats to paint a rosier ...

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On The Media

April 25, 2008

Friday, April 25, 2008

This Week: military analysts on the air, Nazi prison-guard porn and a forgotten New Orleans newspaper

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On The Media

Instruments of War

Friday, April 25, 2008

As reported in The New York Times last weekend, CNN, MSNBC, NPR and others have turned, again and again, to military analysts – retired members of the armed forces hired by broadcast and cable networks – for their supposed expertise on the war. Only, it turns out, the ...

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On The Media

Oh No They Didn't!

Friday, April 25, 2008

Eight of Ohio's top newspapers are sharing content in a cooperative effort called the Ohio News Organization, or OHNO. The arrangement will allow the papers to sidestep the AP. Could this system be a lifeline for struggling news organizations? Is it the end of the scoop as we ...

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On The Media

The Forgotten Paper

Friday, April 25, 2008

In researching his New Orleans neighborhood, Times Picayune columnist Lolis Eric Elie stumbled across the story of the nation's first African-American daily newspaper, The New Orleans Tribune. Elie's new film shows how the paper thrived during Reconstruction and played a large role in legal challenges to segregation, culminating ...

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On The Media

Comics on the Stand

Friday, April 25, 2008

In his new book, The Ten-Cent Plague: The Great Comic-Book Scare and How It Changed America, David Hajdu tells the story of the spectacular rise and devastating fall of the comic book. He says comics helped shape America's post-war cultural landscape.

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On The Media

Rude Awakening

Friday, April 25, 2008

For a few years in the early 1960s, small, pornographic books called Stalags were a runaway success in Israel. The books were set in Nazi prisoner-of-war camps and featured a complicated mix of violence, sex and revenge fantasy. And according to Ari Libsker’s new documentary, "Stalag," ...

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On The Media

Ghostwritten Prescriptions

Friday, April 18, 2008

The Journal of the American Medical Association published a study this week claiming that esteemed doctors frequently put their name on the byline of studies published in medical journals - when the studies were actually written by pharmaceutical companies. JAMA's editor-in-chief Dr. Catherine DeAngelis explains what ...

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On The Media

Papal States

Friday, April 18, 2008

A Stateside visit by Pope Benedict XVI has occasioned fresh reporting of the sex abuse scandal, the American Church and, of course, the Popemobile. National Catholic Reporter news director Tom Roberts says that journalists perform laudably, despite the secrecy of the Church.

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On The Media

Debate Club

Friday, April 18, 2008

Media were awash with charges this week that ABC News hosted little more than a gossipy game-show masquerading as a debate. Or maybe co-moderator George Stephanopoulos posed important questions that cut to the heart of electibility, as he later claimed. Either way, what did ...

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On The Media

April 18, 2008

Friday, April 18, 2008

Show Summary: Why journalists report on the Pope-Mobile rather than asking tough questions when the Pontiff comes to town; what we sacrifice in the long run if we opt for a secure, reliable internet now; and the editor in chief of the Journal of the American Medical Association calls for ...

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On The Media

The Future Perfect

Friday, April 18, 2008

Despite the internet’s runaway success, its future is anything but clear. So says Jonathan Zittrain, professor of internet governance at Oxford University. He explains why the very devices and applications that have enabled internet ubiquity may now be limiting innovation.

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On The Media

War of the Worlds

Friday, April 18, 2008

Our interview with Naseem Mithoowani a couple weeks ago sparked a heated debate on our site about free speech, xenophobia, and a clash of cultures when it comes to Muslim immigrants in western societies. This week Bob takes a broader look at some of those issues in Europe, ...

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On The Media

The Last Shall Be First

Friday, April 11, 2008

Few of the ambitious plans, promised by dozens of U.S. cities, for municipal wireless internet service have materialized. That is, until Internet Archive founder Brewster Kahle turned on lightning-fast, free internet this week to hundreds of residents of San Francisco's public housing projects. ...

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