India

On The Media

Indian State Outlaws "Objectionable Content," Will Start Arresting People for Precrime

Monday, August 25, 2014

The Indian state of Karnataka has not only outlawed sharing "malicious or misleading images" online, it can also arrest citizens for breaking the law before they actually commit a crime.
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On The Media

Murdoch's Media Empire, NFL Bullying and More

Friday, November 08, 2013

A peek inside Rupert Murdoch's media empire, the evolving NFL bullying story, and reporting on rape in India.

On The Media

India’s Reporting on Rape

Friday, November 08, 2013

In December of 2012, a brutal rape in Delhi, India started a fractious debate about crimes against women and--among Indian journalists--about how crimes against women should be reported. Jamie York went to India last summer and spoke to journalists Meena Menon, Meenal Baghel and Shoma Chaudhury and to attorney Vrinda Grover about how India’s female journalists are using this moment to inform a discussion they care deeply about.

 

Music: “Amar Sangeet” by Kashinath Mishra & Prabhakar Dhakde

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On The Media

India's Right to Information

Friday, October 04, 2013

India, infamous for its bureaucracy and corruption, has one of the strongest freedom of information laws in the world. OTM reporter Jamie York went to India to talk to Subhash Agrawal, Nikhil Dey, Aruna Roy, Shailesh Gandhi and Sowmya Kidambi (and to hear Shankar Singh sing) about the struggle to achieve the law and the power and pitfalls of such a transformative tool.

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On The Media

India's Attempt to ID Every Indian

Friday, September 27, 2013

In a 2009 book called Imagining India, Indian tech billionaire Nandan Nilekani imagined a way to address India’s most vexing problems of corruption, poverty and lack of social services – a unique ID number for every Indian. 4 years later, India has undertaken the biggest ID program in human history. It’s called Aadhaar, and Nilekani oversees it. But trying to register 1.2 billion people, many for the first time, comes with serious privacy and data-collection concerns. OTM reporter Jamie York went to India to speak with Nilekani and lawyer Malavika Jayaram about the risk and reward of identifying every Indian.

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On The Media

Mapping Gun Owners, International Journalists Fight Censorship, and More

Friday, January 11, 2013

The ATF's desire for a central database of gun transactions, journalists fight for the right to report on India's rape trial, an interview with 56 Up director Michael Apted, and Chinese journalists strike after the government censored an Op-Ed.

On The Media

Censorship in the Largest Democracy in the World

Friday, January 11, 2013

The rape and murder of a young woman in India has brought protesters to the streets. Both the national and international press have closely followed the public outrage and tepid response from government officials, turning out in full force to see the accused men in court on Monday. The swarm of journalists prompted a local judge to not only ban reporters from the courtroom, but also prohibit anyone from covering the trial. Brooke talks with New York Times reporter Niharika Mandhana about the repercussions of the ban, and about why the government would keep the trial off the public record. 

Tinariwen - Walla Illa

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On The Media

Freedom Of Information Laws in India

Friday, November 18, 2011

India instituted a Right to Information law a few years ago that's very similar to the Freedom of Information Act in the US. The law has worked well as an anti-corruption tool but there's only problem. Some of the people who've used it have been killed afterwards. Bloomberg reporter Mejul Srivasta talks to Bob about how India is trying to protect its whistleblowers.

Tortoise - Gigantes (Mark Ernestus Version)

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