Libya

On The Media

Connecting Through a Revolution

Friday, August 24, 2012

One year ago this week, Libyan rebels took control of the capital city Tripoli, ending the 42-year rule of Muammar al-Qaddafi. When the Libyan uprising began in February of 2011, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman told us about Feb17voices, a project she was involved in to get information out of Libya during a media blackout. Last month, Sarah went to Tripoli to witness Libya's election and to meet the people behind the voices.

The song from this segment has no English title.  Here it is in Arabic: 


تعلى في العالي 

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On The Media

A New (Troubling) Speech Law in Libya

Friday, May 18, 2012

With the first Libyan elections in 40 years just a month away, the shadow of the Gaddafi regime looms large. The National Transitional Council (which holds power in Libya until those elections) recently passed a law that criminalizes glorifying Gaddafi as well as offending the revolution. Bob speaks with Libya Herald editor Sami Zaptia about the implications of the law for speech in Libya.

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On The Media

Reporters Unwittingly Exposing Sources

Friday, April 27, 2012

Journalists have become increasingly reliant on digital technology in their work, but weak or nonexistent digital security measures open their sources to risk of exposure. Brooke speaks to journalist Matthieu Aikins about the need for reporters to take more precautions to protect their digital information, especially in conflict areas.

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On The Media

A Unique Opportunity for Propaganda

Friday, August 26, 2011

Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi’s government-controlled media is gone, but New York Times reporter David Kirkpatrick says that nothing has arisen in Libya to accurately relay the news. Libya, he says, remains a place where there is "no reliable rule or yardstick to measure the truth.” Brooke spoke with Kirkpatrick about the difficulties of separating truth from lies in Tripoli right now.

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On The Media

Libya's Civil War

Friday, June 17, 2011

When popular anger bubbled over in Libya in February, the media described it as a series of protests not unlike those seen in Egypt and Tunisia. But as the conflict escalated, the terminology shifted to "uprising" or "rebellion." This week, the Associated Press told its reporters to now refer to the fighting in Libya as a "civil war." AP Deputy Managing Editor and Standards Editor Tom Kent says the AP is constantly discussing the best terminology to use when reporting the news.

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