Media History

On The Media

Keeping Secrets

Friday, August 05, 2005

New York Times reporter William L. Laurence witnessed the dropping of the atomic bomb, flying with American troops over Nagasaki while the bomb was dropped. He won the Pulitzer Prize for a series of stories he subsequently published, many of which included details about the development and production of the ...

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On The Media

LBJ, Futurist

Friday, June 24, 2005

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, charged with promoting and funding public broadcasting in the U.S. was created by Congress in 1967. But when President Lyndon Johnson signed the Public Broadcasting Law, he had more than radio and TV on his mind. Listen to the moment when LBJ invented the Internet.

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On The Media

Volumes of Harm

Friday, June 10, 2005

What does The Communist Manifesto have in common with The Feminine Mystique? Both are among the top ten most harmful books of the 19th and 20th centuries, as determined by a panel of conservative thinkers assembled by Human Events Magazine. Herb London, president of the Hudson Institute, was among the ...

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On The Media

[Ahem]

Friday, June 03, 2005

This week, journalism's most mysterious anonymous source, Deep Throat, revealed himself to be former G-man W. Mark Felt. Media portrayals have cast him, alternatively, as a crusader driven by affection for the Bureau or a disaffected bureaucrat with an axe to grind. Bob reflects on the media's final installment of ...

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On The Media

Izzy Rules

Friday, August 20, 2004

Fifteen years ago this summer, American journalism lost one of its greatest practitioners. I.F. Stone worked for many newspapers, but always refused to play by the rules of the Washington press corps. Still, Izzy Stone was ahead on covering McCarthyism, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Vietnam War. OTM producer ...

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On The Media

Covering the Leaks

Friday, March 14, 2003

Two weeks ago, the London Observer printed a leaked memo showing that the U.S. was spying on UN officials who were equivocating on an Iraq invasion. The story has been notably absent from much of the US media. But former military man and Pentagon Papers leaker Daniel Ellsberg tells Brooke ...

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On The Media

Sleaze 'o Rama

Friday, February 14, 2003

The nationwide multiplication of multiplexes has left little screen-space for films designed solely to shock and disgust. But once upon a time, movies with names like "Barbed Wire Dolls" and "Nude on the Moon" were featured daily in theaters along the Great White Way. OTM's Rex Doane fondly remembers the ...

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On The Media

The Father of Public Relations

Friday, January 17, 2003

Considering the power and subtlety of public relations today, it's hard to believe there was once a time when advertising was crude - and avoidable. But in the early 20th century, one keen observer of human nature observed that the best pitches were the ones you couldn't see coming. Brooke ...

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On The Media

Books for the Brave

Friday, November 15, 2002

During WWII, the US Army Library Service initiated the largest book giveaway ever: 123 million Armed Services Edition books were sent to American troops stationed all around the world. Author and archivist Andrew Carroll has revived the book giveaway. Carroll joins Bob to discuss the resurrected program.

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On The Media

Sorting the Past

Friday, November 15, 2002

As scholars research the institutions penetrated by, and affiliated with the Nazis during WWII, the number of present-day companies with historical SS affiliations rises. Perhaps one of the biggest to date is Bertelsmann, the German publishing house. Brooke speaks with Mark Landler of the New York Times, who covered the ...

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On The Media

Anti-Nazi Fighter

Friday, November 15, 2002

In his new book, co-author David Wyman posits that early warnings against the Nazi regime were rebuffed and ignored by Americans. "A Race Against Death: Bergson, America and the Holocaust" discusses the efforts of Peter Bergson, who left Palestine for America with the goal of enlisting a Jewish army to ...

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On The Media

Cinerama

Friday, October 11, 2002

Fifty years ago, post-war America witnessed the birth of pop-luxe and theretofore unsurpassed commercial culture. One example of the boom in disposable income and entertainment-related spending came in the form of the 1952 film "This is Cinerama"-a movie which would introduce viewers to what was then the largest movie screen ...

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On The Media

Coverage on Home Turf

Friday, October 11, 2002

CNN had the monopoly on television coverage of the 1991 war with Iraq, but with the rise of Arabic news outlet Al Jazeera, coverage of Iraq could be very different now. But how? Host Bob Garfield speaks with Ibrahim Helal of Al Jazeera, about how television coverage of a war ...

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On The Media

Missile Crisis Memories

Friday, October 11, 2002

This week marks the 40th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis-one of the most politically tense moments of the Kennedy presidency, as well as one of the most memorable media moments of the Cold War. This week, Bob speaks with Fred Kaplan, New York correspondent for the Boston Globe, about ...

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On The Media

High School Reunion

Friday, October 11, 2002

Published by high schoolers at the prestigious Horace Mann School in New York City, "The Record" newspaper turns 100 this year. The school paper was the launching point for the careers of many journalistic luminaries, who celebrated at a dinner at the school's Bronx campus early this month. On the ...

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On The Media

Matic and B92

Friday, October 04, 2002

In the decade of Slobadon Milosevic’s bloody reign over Yugoslavia, the most penetrating voice of democracy in Serbia was a youth radio station. Bob went to Belgrade and spoke with Veran Matic, B92’s founder and chief executive, about how B92 stands apart once again—this time, in its coverage of Serbian ...

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On The Media

Jukeboxes

Friday, September 27, 2002

Did you know that the jukebox has been around for over 80 years? And that at one point they numbered close to a million around the country? On the Media’s Rex Doane takes a look at jukeboxes.

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On The Media

Black Press

Friday, September 27, 2002

Once regarded as the voice of a stifled people, the nation’s 200-plus black newspapers now suffer from a steadily declining readership, fewer advertising dollars, stiff competition, and even a generational divide. What is the future of the black press? On the Media’s Phillip Martin reports.

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On The Media

War Torn Women

Friday, September 20, 2002

Women are such a presence in war reporting now that it's hard to remember a time when they were not. The recently-published book War Torn shares the stories of women journalists who covered Vietnam. Brooke talks with three of those journalists about how they covered the war and why they ...

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On The Media

USA Today

Friday, September 13, 2002

Twenty years ago this week, USAToday was born. The first national, general-interest daily newspaper revolutionized the way news was presented. Readers were drawn to its short stories and colorful graphics. Advertisers were not, and it took the Gannett company more than a decade to turn a profit. But it's profitable ...

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