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Anonymous Distances Itself From Member Who Doxed The Wrong Cop

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Hacker collective Anonymous is distancing itself from a member who posted the name of the wrong police officer in connection with the shooting of Michael Brown.
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On The Media

Cameras in the Interrogation Room

Friday, August 15, 2014

A new Justice Department policy requires the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration, and several other federal law enforcement agencies to videotape interrogations with suspects held in custody. It's a change lauded by all sides of the adversarial process. But, as UCLA law professor Jennifer Mnookin tells Bob, sometimes the power of video can interfere with its objectivity.

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On The Media

No, Ebola is NOT Coming to the U.S.

Friday, August 15, 2014

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is unprecedented in size and geographic scope. But contrary to what the media suggests, it is definitely not coming to the United States. Bob talks with Dr. Daniel Bausch, an expert on the Ebola virus, about what the media keeps missing. 

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On The Media

The View from "Fergustan"

Friday, August 15, 2014

Since the shooting death of Michael Brown by a police officer on Saturday, all eyes have been on the continuous protests being held in Ferguson, Missouri and broadcast over social media. Brooke talks with Trymaine Lee from Ferguson where he has been reporting this week, about what he's seen there. 

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On The Media

Tweets and Vines change Ferguson Coverage, Cameras in the Courtroom, and More

Friday, August 15, 2014

How a virtual livestream of tweets and vines after the Michael Brown shooting changed coverage, remembering the first gavel-gavel coverage of a court case, and fact and fiction on Shark Week.

On The Media

How a St. Louis Suburb Became a War Zone

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Covering tragedies like the shooting death of Ferguson, Mo. teen Michael Brown are difficult for MSNBC reporter Trymaine Lee, but he feels a personal responsibility to continue. “As a black journalist who is tasked with trying to go out the stories about how we live and how we die, and how we overcome, and how our institutions have failed us, it does weigh on you. But if not me, who else?”

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On The Media

The Army's Robot Recruiter

Friday, August 08, 2014

Sergeant Star is a chatbot designed to influence potential recruits to enlist. Alex Goldman of our podcast TLDR wasn't sure how he felt about that, so he talked to the Army and a reporter who's covered recruitment abuses to consider the pros and cons of deploying a Siri to guide our decision to go to war. 

This story originally appeared in a longer form on the TLDR Podcast. If you would like to hear a longer version of this story and Alex's update with Dave Maass of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, follow this link.

Music: Kraftwerk - Pocket Calculator. Special thanks to @M0X1 (Mo Xie) for the suggestion on Twitter!

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On The Media

TLDR #32 - An Imperfect Match

Monday, August 04, 2014

Last week, dating site OK Cupid put up a blog post describing experiments it conducted on its users. In one experiment, the site told users who were bad matches for one another that they were actually good matches, and vice versa. Alex and PJ talk to OK Cupid President and co-founder Christian Rudder about the ubiquity of online user experimentation and his defense of potentially sending OK Cupid's users on bad dates.

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On The Media

#32 - An Imperfect Match

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Some users of dating site OkCupid are upset at revelations that it was deliberately experimenting on its users by taking people who were bad matches and telling they were actually good for one another.

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On The Media

Silliness and Moral Indignation

Friday, July 25, 2014

Brooke examines how comedians like Jon Stewart, John Oliver, and Stephen Colbert make us laugh by combining silliness and moral indignation.  

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On The Media

A Breakthrough HIV Drug, Chronicling Gun Violence, and SIMS

Friday, July 18, 2014

How a pill called Truvada is changing the face of gay sex, reporting on every gun death in America, and why Central Americans continue to make the perilous journey north. 

On The Media

Anti-Obamacare Ads (Really) Didn't Work

Friday, July 18, 2014

Spending on negative Obamacare ads eclipsed spending on positive ads by a remarkable 15-1 ratio. Brooke talks with Niam Yaraghi of the Brooking Institution, who says that anti-Obamacare ads actually drove up enrollment.  

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On The Media

Reporting on the "Border Crisis" From El Salvador

Friday, July 18, 2014

The past several weeks have seen a surge in coverage of the crisis on the US-Mexico border, and the media abounds with critics of immigration reform who fault the Obama administration's lax policies. Bob talks with Carlos Dada, co-founder and editor of the El Salvadoran newspaper El Faro, who says that US critics are completely missing the point.

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On The Media

The End of 'Gun Report'

Friday, July 18, 2014

It was a New York Times blog that chronicled daily shootings across the country, in an effort to highlight victims of gun violence between highly-covered mass shootings. Co-author Jennifer Mascia recounts what it was like spending a year writing about every victim.

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On The Media

The FTC Is Suing Amazon For In-App Purchases By Children

Friday, July 11, 2014

The FTC wants to make it harder for children to make purchases in tablet and smartphone games.

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On The Media

Behind the Border Crisis

Friday, July 11, 2014

For the past few weeks the media have been reporting on a surge in unaccompanied minors who are crossing the border illegally, bringing attention to the latest immigration crisis. But the reality of the situation is far more complicated. Brooke talks with reporter Bob Ortega about what's really happening on the border.

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On The Media

A FOIA Too Far

Friday, July 11, 2014

Jeff Scudder was working in the CIA's Historical Collections Division when he found a trove of documents that were declassified and ready for release to the public, but hadn't, due to bureaucratic strife. So he filed a FOIA request. Bob talks with Scudder about how this request ultimately resulted in his ousting from the agency.

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On The Media

YouTube is Calling Out ISPs That Are Throttling Traffic

Monday, July 07, 2014

Recently, Netflix royally pissed off Verizon by calling out the ISP for slow streaming video. The two companies went back and forth for a while, with Verizon demanding that Netflix cut it out, and Netflix essentially saying "Ok, fine. But we might bring them back. You should serve your customers better." Now Google is offering an even more granular service called the "Video Quality Report," which will allow users to check out their YouTube streaming quality and compare to other providers in the area.

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On The Media

TLDR #30 - The Russian Troll Army

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Last month, documents surfaced that showed a company called the Internet Research Agency was paying people in Russia to go to an office and post pro-Kremlin comments all day. Alex talks to Buzzfeed's Max Seddon about why they do it, and how successful they actually are at swaying public opinion.

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On The Media

This Is About More Than Sects

Friday, June 27, 2014

Since the violent extremist group ISIS began taking control of large parts of Iraq, a common media narrative has emerged: in the absence of a tyrant or occupying force, sectarian hatred is once again tearing the country apart. Brooke talks with history professor Ibrahim al-Marashi about whether that narrative is actually the best way to look at what's going on in Iraq.

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