National Security

On The Media

The Patriot Act, Encore

Friday, May 29, 2015

In the wake of the Charlie Hebdo shootings in Paris, French legislators are considering a new law that looks a lot like what the US passed after 9/11.

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On The Media

Nagging Questions About the Bin Laden Raid

Friday, May 15, 2015

While other journalists rushed to debunk Sy Hersh's latest story, Carlotta Gall of the New York Times says there's a lot to follow up on - and at least one detail rings true. 

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On The Media

Who Oversees the Drone Program?

Friday, May 01, 2015

News that a US drone strike killed two innocent Americans raised new questions about who really runs the program, and who oversees it. 

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On The Media

Stephen Kim's Leak

Friday, March 20, 2015

Stephen Kim is in prison for speaking about a classified document with a reporter, but according to journalist Peter Maass the government threw the book at the wrong leaker. 

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On The Media

FBI Rebranding?

Friday, January 10, 2014

In an article for Foreign Policy’s ‘The Cable”, reporter John Hudson noted a substitution in the FBI’s fact sheet: its primary function had been changed from ‘law enforcement’ to ‘national security.’ Brooke talks to Tim Weiner, author of Enemies: A History of the FBI, about this not so new mission statement. 

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On The Media

The Edward Snowden Narrative, Privacy vs. Convenience, and More

Friday, June 14, 2013

The media's turn from the value of Edward Snowden's leaks to the nature of his character, the evolving story of the PRISM program, and privacy in the age of the internet.

On The Media

The Ever Changing Story of the PRISM Program

Friday, June 14, 2013

Last Thursday brought leaks that about a government program called PRISM. But while the early reports described a program that had unilateral, unfettered access to companies like Google, Yahoo, and Microsoft, subsequent reports made the program look significantly less intrusive. Brooke talks to Wired's Kim Zetter about the evolution of reporting on PRISM, the perils of national security reporting, and what we still don't know about the government program.

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On The Media

National Security Letters and Gag Orders

Friday, January 04, 2013

The most serious kind of subpoena - called a 'National Security Letter' - used to have a lifetime gag-order automatically attached. That is until Nicholas Merrill appealed his and won the right to talk about it. Despite 50,000 national security letters a year, there are only three organizations that have ever won the right to say they got one. In a segment that originally aired in January of 2011, Nick Merrill tells Bob why he's the exception and the rule.

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On The Media

The NCTC: Obama's "Pre-Crime Squad"?

Friday, January 04, 2013

Last March, the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) was granted unprecedented power to collect data on ordinary U.S. citizens, data like flight records or lists of casino employees. Critics have likened the NCTC to the "Pre-Crime Squad" in the movie "Minority Report." Wall Street Journal reporter Julia Angwin talks with Bob about this dramatic shift in the intelligence community's power over US citizens.

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