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A Crisis of Cartographic Proportions

Friday, March 28, 2014

While Russia annexed Crimea with scarcely a shot fired, the crisis has grown heated between cartographers. An editing war broke out on Wikipedia's map of Russia, and National Geographic sparked outrage by suggesting it would map Crimea as Russian territory once the Kremlin made it official. Bob talks with Michael Blanding, author of the forthcoming book The Map Thief, about how map-making by nature is a risky geopolitical game.

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On The Media

Russian Media Tropes, At Home and Abroad

Friday, March 21, 2014

Michael McFaul has just returned to Stanford University after a couple of tumultuous years in Moscow as the U.S. ambassador to Russia. He talks with Brooke about the tropes he saw in the Russian media while he was there, and what he's noticed in the American media since he's been back.

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On The Media

Not-So-Private Metadata

Friday, March 21, 2014

The NSA has defended its controversial surveillance program by arguing that it just collects metadata, and therefore doesn't violate the privacy of individual Americans. But computer scientists at Stanford Security Lab have conducted their own simulation of the NSA's program, and found the metadata to be inherently revealing. Bob speaks with Jonathan Mayer, one of the researchers on the project, about how much can be learned just from the numbers.

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On The Media

So Many Keys

Friday, March 21, 2014

Four times a year, members of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICAAN, take part in an elaborate ceremony (iris scanners!) designed to assure the world that the organization is doing its best to keep the web connected and safe. Brooke explains the meeting of the keyholders, with insight from Guardian reporter James Ball, who attended one of the ceremonies last month.

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On The Media

Cold War 2.0, The Guardians of the Internet, and More

Friday, March 21, 2014

Russia's new propaganda war, not-so-private metadata, and the people with the keys to the internet.

On The Media

Pulling the Trigger Warning

Friday, March 14, 2014

Trigger warnings on the internet have been around for years as a way to prepare for potentially disturbing subjects. Recently a group of students at the University of California, Santa Barbara passed a resolution imploring administrators to include mandatory trigger warnings in potentially offensive syllabi.  Bob speaks to journalist Jenny Jarvie, about the spread of the trigger warning.

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On The Media

Covering a missing airplane, Copyright in outer space, and more

Friday, March 14, 2014

How the media are covering the story of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight, the re-birth of the First Amendment, and copyright law in outer space.

On The Media

The Re-Birth of the First Amendment

Friday, March 14, 2014

Fifty years ago, the Supreme Court made a decision in the case New York Times v Sullivan that would forever alter the way journalists practiced journalism. Brooke speaks with Andrew Cohen, contributing editor at The Atlantic and fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice, about the decision's impact on the First Amendment.

Supreme Court audio courtesy of Oyez®, a multimedia judicial archive at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law

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On The Media

What Became of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370?

Friday, March 14, 2014

From terrorism to catastrophic structural failure to alien tractor beams, theories on the vanishing jetliner have come fast and furious. And one after another, they have themselves disappeared into nothingness. Bob reflects on how a story that lacks not only the “why,” but also the “what,” gets covered in the news.

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On The Media

Google Flu Trends Is Wrong. A Lot.

Thursday, March 13, 2014

In 2008, Google launched Google Flu Trends, a service that would track the spread of the flu in the US based on Google searches for symptoms like "cough" or "fever." At the time, journalists heralded it as delivering on the promise of all the data generated on the internet. Well, it turns out that Google Flu Trends is wrong. A lot.

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On The Media

The President's Appearance on Between Two Ferns Seems to Have Worked

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

The web comedy show was the number one referrer to healthcare.gov yesterday.

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On The Media

On the Subject of Doxing

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Yesterday, I wrote an article about how doxing differs from reporting, and about Newsweek's article alleging that it had found the elusive creator of Bitcoin, Satoshi Nakamoto. In the post I said that whether Leah McGrath Goodman's Newsweek story constituted doxing rested entirely on whether she had found the right man or not. She has claimed in multiple interviews that she is confident she has. The internet, however, apparently furious at what it considers a violation of the putative Bitcoin creator's privacy, has chosen to give Newsweek a taste of its own medicine by doxing Goodman and two others.

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On The Media

Watch Edward Snowden's SXSW Video Interview

Monday, March 10, 2014

Edward Snowden spoke live via video conference with the ACLU's Christopher Soghoian today at 12PM EST about the NSA's spying on the tech community and technological solutions to avoid surveillance. If you missed it, you can watch below.

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On The Media

The likely hoax app that requires you to be drunk before you can use it.

Friday, March 07, 2014

Livr is a new social networking app named for the organ you will be destroying while you use it. You see, you can only access Livr if your blood alcohol level is above a certain number.

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On The Media

An Unusual Alliance

Friday, March 07, 2014

The Serbian government has established a commission to investigate unsolved murders of journalists. Remarkably, the commission includes both police and journalists. Bob talks with Politika editor Ljiljana Smajlović about what the commission has already accomplished and her hopes for what it might achieve in the future. 

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On The Media

The State of Crimean Journalism

Friday, March 07, 2014

Last weekend, as Russian troops flooded into Crimea, Ukraine, 30 armed men in unmarked fatigues broke into the office of the Crimean Center for Investigative Journalism in the region's capital. The incident is one of many recent acts of aggression against journalists in the region.

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On The Media

The Crisis in Crimea, Dissent on Russia Today, Streaming Media and More

Friday, March 07, 2014

The effort to preserve journalistic freedom during the Crimean crisis. Plus, Bob Garfield issues a special report on the streaming video revolution.

On The Media

#18 - The Army's Robot Recruiter

Thursday, March 06, 2014

Sgt. Star is a chatbot designed to influence potential recruits to enlist in the US Army. So how do we feel about that?

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On The Media

The Pseudonymous Man Behind Bitcoin Has Been Found, and He's Not a Pseudonym

Thursday, March 06, 2014

Long thought to be a pseudonym, journalists have pointed the finger at economists, cryptographers and mathematicians as possible people behind the digital currency. Until now. Maybe.

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On The Media

Facebook Will Now Let You Block All Articles from Any Website

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

If you’ve got a friend who posts every single Upworthy article, you can put a stop to the deluge without unfriending.

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