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On The Media

Susan Orlean Has Made Me Not Hate the Horse_eBooks Guys So Much

Monday, February 03, 2014

If you've been following TLDR since the jump-off, then you probably know how we feel about the big reveal of both Pronunciation Book and Horse_ebooks as lead-ins the the bafflingly boring Bear Sterns Bravo. Pronunciation Book simply collapsed under the weight of the buzz and anticipation that it generated (including in our debut episode), while Horse_ebooks felt like another reminder of the internet's bottomless capacity for deception. Well Susan Orlean's New Yorker profile of Jacob Bakkila and Thomas Bender (paywalled), the guys behind the whole enterprise, came out today. And as much as I hate to admit it, it gave me a sort of grudging respect for their work, at least conceptually.

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On The Media

Patent Holders Strike Again

Monday, February 03, 2014

Last week brought us two patent troll stories.

Do you remember Lycos? It was sort of the proto-Google, and was, for a time in the late 90's, the most visited site on the web. Those days are now long gone, but patents that were once owned by Lycos are now being used to force Google to fork over a hefty chunk  of its revenue.

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On The Media

The Inventor of Instant Replay

Friday, January 31, 2014

This weekend’s superbowl comes just over 50 years after the Army-Navy football game of December 1963, when we saw the very first use of instant replay. As Anna Clark wrote in Pacific Standard, the television trick that transformed the way we watch and officiate sports is thanks to an intrepid producer named Tony Verna, who would go on to achieve acclaim overseeing myriad live TV events like the bi-continental charity concert “Live Aid” and specials with Pope John Paul II. Brooke talks with Tony Verna about why it was so hard to replay live television back then, and how he found a way to outsmart his equipment. 

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On The Media

The Belfast Project

Friday, January 31, 2014

Begun in 2000, the Belfast Project was an oral history project that aimed to document combatants’ stories in the clashes between the Irish Republican Army and the Irish Loyalist Army in the 1970s through the 1990s. But the charged nature of what interviewees told the project has brought immense pressure on the project's organizers to release records of the interviews, which they'd promised to keep secret. Brooke talks with Anthony McIntyre who recorded many of the interviews for the project.

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On The Media

The 10th Anniversary of the "Wardrobe Malfunction"

Friday, January 31, 2014

10 years ago, the 90 million people who were watching the 38th Super Bowl's half time show bore witness to the first so-called "wardrobe malfunction" when Justin Timberlake accidentally exposed Janet Jackson's breast. That nine-sixteenths of a second had profound and far reaching effects on our culture, writes Marin Cogan for ESPN Magazine. Brooke talks with Cogan about her article, "In the Beginning, There Was a Nipple," that explores how history changed in the wake of "Nipplegate."

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On The Media

Stephen Glass Can't Be a Lawyer

Friday, January 31, 2014

Earlier this week the California Supreme Court ruled that Stephen Glass could not become a lawyer in the state. Bob considers whether that was the right decision.  

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On The Media

Egypt's Widening Crackdown on Dissent

Friday, January 31, 2014

Three years after the euphoric toppling of Hosni Mubarak’s authoritarian regime, there’s a tragic sense of déjà vu in Egypt. The military-led government is smothering dissent, whether it comes from the Muslim brotherhood, liberal activists, bloggers, or journalists. In a landscape in which both state and private media toe the military line, the online newspaper Mada Masr is a rare independent voice. Bob speaks with the paper’s editor-in-chief, Lina Attalah, about how she’s experiencing the crackdown.  

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On The Media

The Media Crisis in Egypt, Instant Replay and More

Friday, January 31, 2014


On The Media

Prince's Troubled Relationship With the Internet

Monday, January 27, 2014

Prince is suing 22 fans, for $1 million a piece, for posting links to bootlegs of his concerts on filesharing sites. This is just the latest volley in Prince's long standing love/hate (well, mostly hate/hate) relationship with the internet.

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On The Media

Hunter Moore's Indictment Yesterday Was For Hacking, Not For Revenge Porn

Friday, January 24, 2014

Yesterday, revenge porn pioneer and all around gross dude Hunter Moore was indicted by the United States District Court for the Central District of California. But even though California has revenge porn statutes on the books, the bulk of the charges were made under what is known as the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, or, more colloquially, The Hacker Law.

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On The Media

Do the Motivations of Leakers Matter?

Friday, January 24, 2014

A recent Pew poll found that although 45% of Americans believe Snowden's leak helped the public, 56% wanted criminal charges brought against him. Did he act to protect the rights of Americans, or dismantle what he considers a surveillance state? Does it matter why he acted? Brooke talks to New Republic contributing editor Sean Wilentz about his cover story that asks that very question.

Beacon - Late November

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On The Media

On "Dr. V's Magical Putter"

Friday, January 24, 2014

Last week, ESPN’s  Grantland ran a remarkable story titled “Dr. V’s Magical Putter,” a journalistic odyssey that began with curiosity about a supposedly revolutionary golf club, and ended by focusing on the chaotic life of its inventor, a woman named Essay Anne Vanderbilt.  The reporter, Caleb Hannan, discovered that Vanderbilt was transgender, and he revealed his knowledge of this fact to Vanderbilt. Shortly after, Vanderbilt committed suicide. Bob speaks with ESPN.com writer and transgender activist, Christina Kahrl, to understand the errors in “Dr. V’s Magical Putter.” 

Chez le photographe du motel

 

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On The Media

Snowden's Beliefs, Banning the word "Nazi" in Israel, and More

Friday, January 24, 2014

A look at whether the motivation of leakers matters, Israel's push to ban the word "Nazi," and new frontiers in child porn law.

On The Media

Revenge Porn Pioneer Hunter Moore Indicted

Thursday, January 23, 2014

UPDATE: read indictment below.

Time Magazine is reporting that Hunter Moore has been indicted by a grand jury for conspiracy to “access a protected computer without authorization to obtain information for private financial gain.” There aren't many details available and I haven't seen a copy of the indictment online, but will update the story as that information comes in. In the meantime, I've embedded Bob's interview with Moore from December of 2011 below:

hm

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On The Media

Now you can listen to radio stations from all over the world on the internet. But why would you want to?

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Will internet users be interested in a service that allows them to do a search 40,000 radio stations throughout the world? One entrepreneur thinks so.

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On The Media

Behold! The Internet's Beauty Catalogued

Thursday, January 23, 2014

If there is one idea that PJ and I drive towards both on the TLDR blog and on the podcast, it's that the internet can be a beautiful, magical place. It is the staging ground for so much cleverness and creativity and humanity. So, imagine my delight this morning when I stumbled upon a Reddit subreddit called "internet is beautiful."

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On The Media

Facebook is still not dying

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Another day, another hysterical report on the demise of Facebook.

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On The Media

Twitter Tries to Cash in on Large Minority Userbase

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Ther have been two wholly unrelated truths about Twitter almost since the service premiered. The first is that it has a black and Hispanic userbase that is much larger than the internet as a whole. The second is the service remains unprofitable. Twitter is hoping to seize on the first point to rectify the second.

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On The Media

Have You Been Pwned?

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

It's has simply become a fact of life now that personal information is going to be compromised by hackers. Both private and public entities are routinely having information stolen because they are either unable or unwilling to properly inoculate against these kinds of attacks. So if you can't rely on third parties to safeguard your data, there should at least be a way to know if it has fallen into the hands of hackers. Now there is.

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On The Media

The Feds Have $25 Million In Bitcoin From the Silk Road. Now What?

Friday, January 17, 2014

Yesterday, the US District Attorney's Office for the Souther District of New York announced the forfeiture of 29,655 bitcoins from the servers it seized from Ross Ulbricht, the owner of defunct internet drug marketplace Silk Road. According to this bitcoin converter, that is about $24.5 million dollars worth of bitcoins. But since the US doesn't legally allow bitcoin exchanges, what can the feds do with it?

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