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The State of the News Media

Friday, March 22, 2013

This week, the Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism released its annual “State of the News Media” report, detailing the health, or in this case the frailty, of mainstream US media online and off. The report contained a litany of grim statistics about the consumption and economics of news. Bob talks to Pew Associate Director Mark Jurkowitz, who says the situation isn’t is bleak as it could be.


Beastie Boys - Multilateral Nuclear Disarmament

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On The Media

The Surprising History of Gun Control, School Shooting Myths, and More

Friday, December 21, 2012

The surprising history of the gun control narrative, the media myths of past school shootings, and the problem when the media speculate on the mental health of shooters.

On The Media

Seattle Times Purchases Political Ads

Friday, November 02, 2012

The Seattle Times Company has undertaken an experiment it says will show newspapers deserve more political ad dollars: buying and publishing political ads on its own pages. Readers have seen full-page ads in favor of the Republican candidate for governor, as well as ads in support of a referendum that would legalize gay marriage. Bob Garfield speaks with Eli Sanders of Seattle's alt-weekly The Stranger, about why the ads have infuriated subscribers and the newspaper's staff, while leaving everyone else scratching their heads.

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On The Media

The End of Endorsements

Friday, October 19, 2012

If you read the local paper in Boston, Denver, or Sacramento, soon you’re likely to see endorsements for candidates cropping up on the editorial page. But if you get your news in Atlanta, Chicago, or Tuscaloosa, you probably won’t. In recent years, papers in these cities have gotten out of the endorsement business. Bob talks to Kevin Riley, editor of Georgia's largest newspaper, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, about his paper's decision to end editorial endorsements.

Ahmad Jamal - Tranquility

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On The Media

Sun Myung Moon

Friday, September 07, 2012

This week, Sun Myung Moon, media tycoon and spiritual leader of the Unification Church, died at the age of 92. In this interview from 2008, Bob talks John Gorenfeld, author of Bad Moon Rising: How Reverend Moon Created the Washington Times, Seduced the Religious Right and Built an American Kingdom about Moon's newspaper The Washington Times.

Strange Names - Broken Mirror

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On The Media

Predictions of a Newsosaur

Friday, December 30, 2011

Rather than just fixating on what went wrong for the press in 2011, we thought we'd look forward to what will most likely go wrong in 2012. Former newspaper editor and current blogger Alan Mutter tells Bob that for local legacy media companies, 2012 will be the year when the digital giants show up to take a much larger bite out of their market share.

New Country Rehab - Ramblin' Man

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On The Media

The Fed's Lending During the Crisis Revealed

Friday, December 02, 2011

After a long court battle, Bloomberg.com has obtained crucial details about Federal Reserve lending during the financial crisis. We now know which banks got what amount of money. That's information lawmakers didn't have when they were crafting financial regulations. Brooke spoke with Bloomberg's Bob Ivry, who says that if law makers had known more - the financial regulations we have now might look very different. 

Stateless – Ariel

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On The Media

Pew Looks At The Local News Ecosystem

Friday, September 30, 2011

While studies have consistently shown TV news to be America’s number-one source of local information, a new Pew Study paints a far more nuanced picture of our local information ecosystem by breaking down local news into specific topics—from politics to restaurants. Brooke talks to Pew's Lee Rainie about what the study tells us.

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On The Media

The Leak at WikiLeaks

Friday, September 02, 2011

This week WikiLeaks released the largest number of US diplomatic cables to date, but the release has been overshadowed by an unredacted leak of its entire cache of cables. Bob talks to Atlantic Wire writer Adam Clark Estes about who's blaming who for the leak at WikiLeaks and what this could mean for WikiLeaks in the future.

Song: Lead Us To The End

Artist: The Quantic Soul Orchestra

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On The Media

The Redemption of the New York Times Paywall

Friday, July 29, 2011

In January of 2010, facing declining subscriptions and ad revenue, the New York Times announced it would be implementing a paywall. Critics called the decision counter intuitive, saying it would be the undoing of the paper. Reporter Seth Mnookin wrote about the paywall for New York Magazine this week.  He tells Brooke that it's actually exceeded even The Times' own expectations.

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On The Media

To Catch A Thief

Friday, March 19, 2010

With plagiarism detection software, media organizations can check articles for stolen content before they get published. However, hardly any news organizations actually use the software. The Columbia Journalism Review's Craig Silverman says that it's time for organizations to start investing in these programs to ...

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On The Media

Family Ties

Friday, February 12, 2010

Last weekend, New York Times Jerusalem bureau chief Ethan Bronner revealed that his son had joined the Israel Defense Forces. Amid cries over a conflict of interest – including from the paper’s own ombudsmanTimes executive editor Bill Keller insisted that, as far as ...

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On The Media

Local Angle

Friday, January 22, 2010

Scott Brown's victory in Massachusetts surprised many in media and political circles. But surely the local press and pundits who followed the race closely for months saw it coming? Not so much. Boston Phoenix political reporter David Bernstein describes what he, and the ...

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On The Media

And Now A Word For Our Sponsor

Friday, January 15, 2010

Last summer the Washington Post, in an attempt to increase revenue, planned a series of off-the-record salons whereby a sponsor could pay for the opportunity to meet with government officials, Post reporters, and others to discuss, say, health care. The man responsible for implementing and marketing the salons was media ...

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On The Media

Who is Daniel Lippman?

Friday, January 01, 2010

Countless reporters in D.C. are accustomed to seeing Daniel Lippman's name in their in-boxes. The Associated Press's Ron Fournier says Lippman's emails are filled with helpful and polite corrections. And Lippman, who is 19 years old, explains why he's become a rogue copy editor.

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On The Media

Moments of Regret

Friday, January 01, 2010

When the media makes a mistake, Craig Silverman takes note. He’s the creator of the website Regret the Error, and he joins us again with his annual round-up of the year in corrections, errors, apologies and more. Silverman says 2009 was the year of fact checking, but ...

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On The Media

Life Archive

Friday, December 18, 2009

Newspaper archives used to live in dusty stacks in libraries. Today, they're a five second Google search away, leaving news organizations grappling with the question of what to do when an article haunts a source, or even a journalist, online for...essentially...ever. OTM producer Nazanin Rafsanjani reports.

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On The Media

Direct to Consumer Science

Friday, October 09, 2009

Science departments at newspapers everywhere are shrinking. One outlet that aims to help fill the coverage gap is Futurity.org, a new website that lets scientists publish their findings directly to the public. Michael Schoenfeld, Futurity’s co-founder, explains the site’s mission.

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On The Media

Newspapers Go To Washington

Friday, September 25, 2009

Washington is paying attention to the newspaper crisis. The president has even weighed in. But some worry that any government help would create a conflict of interest. Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD), sponsor of The Newspaper Revitalization Act, and Jim Moroney, publisher of ...

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On The Media

Post-Newspaper Journalism?

Friday, August 21, 2009

What would happen if a major U.S. city was suddenly without a daily newspaper? It seems increasingly possible these days and so the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism set out to find an answer. They hired business analysts to create economic ...

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