Politics

On The Media

Capturing Egypt’s Neverending Story

Friday, February 21, 2014

The Oscar-nominated documentary “The Square” turns a lens on the Egyptian revolution and its aftermath through the eyes of three very different men whose lives intersected in Tahrir Square in 2011. Brooke talks with director Jehane Noujaim and producer Karim Amer about capturing Egypt’s unfolding narrative on camera. Audio courtesy of the Paley Center for Media.

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On The Media

Drone Law

Friday, February 21, 2014

A rash of state laws considered or passed in 2013 seek to rein in drone surveillance. They offer a patchwork of restrictions that seem to reflect the particular culture, or business interests, of individual states. Bob talks with Margot Kaminski, executive director of the Information Society Project and a lecturer at Yale Law School, who has surveyed the legal landscape and noticed a trend.

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On The Media

Protests in Ukraine

Friday, February 21, 2014

Before an agreement was brokered Friday, the standoff in Kiev between Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych’s government and the loose coalition of anti-government forces was bloody and telegenic. Bob examines what those gripping images tell us, and what they don't. 

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On The Media

The Media Shrugs, Again

Friday, February 14, 2014

Republican Congressman Jim Bridenstine was recently working a crowd of seniors in his Oklahoma district and complaining about President Obama, when a constituent raised her hand and called the president an "enemy combatant" who should be "executed." Congressman Bridenstine responded not by objecting to her statement, but rather by stoking the flames with his own angry anti-Obama rant. A video of the event was posted online, but triggered little attention. Bob ponders the ubiquity of vile, ignorant, and just plain crackpot speech among elected officials, and the extent to which the public, and the media, fail to care. 

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On The Media

In Russia, Not Covering Sports

Friday, February 07, 2014

NBC spent $775 million for the rights to the Olympic games, and will provide more than 1500 hours of coverage - most of it on the events themselves. But its also sent reporters to cover Russia’s many political subplots. Bob speaks with NBC Chief Foreign Correspondent Richard Engel about being deployed to cover the political backdrop to the Olympics.

Olympics Forever

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On The Media

What's In A Name

Friday, February 07, 2014

Over the past few years, a number of media outlets have made the editorial choice not to publish the word "Redskin" when referring to Washington's professional football team. OTM producer Chris Neary has the story of one Pennsylvania paper that stopped using the word. 

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On The Media

"Winter Chill" for Russian Media

Friday, February 07, 2014

As the global spotlight fixes on Sochi this weekend, the Russian government is crushing dissent...and there’s a lot of it. As the Committee to Protect Journalists notes in a new report, people there have suffered long-lasting power outages, environmental damage, evictions, corruption, and widespread violation of labor laws. But local news organizations are silent on these issues, instead functioning as public relations agencies for the government. Brooke talks with Nina Ognianova about the stories that aren't being told in the Russian media. 

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On The Media

The Belfast Project

Friday, January 31, 2014

Begun in 2000, the Belfast Project was an oral history project that aimed to document combatants’ stories in the clashes between the Irish Republican Army and the Irish Loyalist Army in the 1970s through the 1990s. But the charged nature of what interviewees told the project has brought immense pressure on the project's organizers to release records of the interviews, which they'd promised to keep secret. Brooke talks with Anthony McIntyre who recorded many of the interviews for the project.

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On The Media

Egypt's Widening Crackdown on Dissent

Friday, January 31, 2014

Three years after the euphoric toppling of Hosni Mubarak’s authoritarian regime, there’s a tragic sense of déjà vu in Egypt. The military-led government is smothering dissent, whether it comes from the Muslim brotherhood, liberal activists, bloggers, or journalists. In a landscape in which both state and private media toe the military line, the online newspaper Mada Masr is a rare independent voice. Bob speaks with the paper’s editor-in-chief, Lina Attalah, about how she’s experiencing the crackdown.  

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On The Media

The Future of Oral History Projects

Friday, January 31, 2014

Brooke speaks with Jack Dunn, the Director of the Boston College News and Public Affairs office about what Boston College has done to protect the tapes from the Belfast Project and the future of academic oral history projects.  

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On The Media

Stephen Glass Can't Be a Lawyer

Friday, January 31, 2014

Earlier this week the California Supreme Court ruled that Stephen Glass could not become a lawyer in the state. Bob considers whether that was the right decision.  

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On The Media

Banning The Other N-Word?

Friday, January 24, 2014

The Israeli Knesset has given preliminary approval to a bill that would criminalize use of the word Nazi, and Nazi symbols, except in certain educational or artistic contexts. Violators could face fines as high as twenty-nine thousand dollars, and up to six months in jail. Backers of the bill seek to prevent disrespect of the Holocaust that results when Nazis are invoked casually, whether in political invective or adolescent insults. Brooke talks with linguistic anthropologist Paja Faudree about this legislative attempt to control the use of language.

The Bees - Winter Rose

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On The Media

Obama Threads the NSA Needle

Friday, January 17, 2014

Today President Obama announced changes to the United States’ surveillance policies. While Obama addressed greater security measures for telephone data, much of the NSA’s surveillance practices remain intact. Listen to a sneak preview of this week’s On the Media, where Brooke Gladstone examines the President’s proposal for the future of the NSA surveillance program.

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On The Media

The Obamacare Horror Story

Friday, January 10, 2014

During the tumultuous roll-out of the Affordable Care Act, the media struggled to find stories of people who had successfully bought insurance through healthcare.gov, and many landed on sources that turned out to be unreliable. But now, another dubious narrative is all the rage: the Obamacare horror story. Bob talks to health policy writer Maggie Mahar, who is very suspicious of the nightmarish tales reported in the media. 

 

 

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On The Media

Creationism’s Public Relations Campaign

Friday, January 10, 2014

A recent Pew Research Center analysis finds that one-third of Americans reject the theory of evolution, believing that “humans and other living things have existed in their present form since the beginning of time.” Brooke speaks to Edward Caudill, author of Intelligently Designed: How Creationists Built the Campaign Against Evolution, who says that modern media has been a godsend for Creationists.

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On The Media

The Myth of 'Blue Monday,' The Campaign for Creationism, and a Lying Cyborg Telemarketer

Friday, January 10, 2014

Journalists converge on two of their favorite wintertime topics, extreme weather and 'Blue Monday.' The FBI re-brands itself and much more.

On The Media

Sometimes, Native Advertising is Actually Pretty Good

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

I am generally not a fan of advertising of any kind. Print, billboards, TV - no matter how creative you are, I find it an annoying distraction that I try to tune out. But there have been a couple of smart attempts at online advertising recently that were great not so much for their content, but for their rollout. They spoke to me because is was clear that the folks behind the campaigns have a pretty good grip on the internet.

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On The Media

A Surprise Ruling

Friday, December 20, 2013

On Monday, a DC District Court judge issued a surprise injunction against the NSA's massive metadata gathering. Bob talks with University of Chicago Law Professor Aziz Huq who says that even though the injunction has little chance of surviving appeal, it may still have an influence. 

Shigeto - Ringleader

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On The Media

The Real Story of the Welfare Queen

Friday, December 20, 2013

In the late 1970s, Ronald Reagan told the story of a woman in Chicago who became known as the welfare queen, the embodiment of the problems with the welfare state. Like most myths, there’s some grain of truth embedded in this narrative: there was a woman in Chicago who was indicted on welfare fraud,  but her other crimes were far more grave. Brooke speaks with Josh Levin, executive editor of Slate, about his investigation of Linda Taylor, America’s original welfare queen.

Ike & Tina Turner - I Smell Trouble

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On The Media

The NSA Gets a Report Card

Friday, December 20, 2013

This week, the White House released a 300-page report, which included a list of 46 recommendations to change the NSA’s surveillance techniques and increase transparency and oversight. Brooke talks with Richard Clarke, a member of the panel, about the group’s attempt to address the privacy concerns of Americans.

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