Pop Culture

On The Media

TLDR #25 - Monsters

Sunday, May 11, 2014

Kim Correa loves the online game DayZ, which lets you interact with other humans during a zombie apocalypse. DayZ's appeal is that it allows weird, spontaneous interactions between players. It also allows really terrible ones. Kim talks about her experience of being raped in a virtual world -- something she doesn't quite know what to do with. We also talk to writer Julian Dibbel, who wrote about how one online community dealt with a virtual rape back in 1993.

Read More

On The Media

#25 - Monsters

Thursday, May 08, 2014

Kim Correa loves the online game DayZ, which lets you interact with other humans during a zombie apocalypse. DayZ's appeal is that it allows weird, spontaneous interactions between players. It also allows really terrible ones. Kim talks about her experience of being raped in a virtual world -- something she doesn't quite know what to do with. We also talk to writer Julian Dibbel, who wrote about how one online community dealt with a virtual rape back in 1993. 

Read More

On The Media

Why Crowdfund a Sequel to a 20-Year-Old Video Game Everyone Hated?

Thursday, May 08, 2014

If you were a gamer at the dawn of the console wars era, then you probably remember Shaq Fu. It was essentially a Shaquille O'Neal branded Mortal Kombat, except it was also unplayable and ugly. Even Electronic Arts, the company behind the game has called it an abomination. So, naturally, the internet has decided that 20 years on, we need a sequel.

Read More

Comment

On The Media

The wikiHow Guide to Stopping a Wedding

Wednesday, May 07, 2014

wikiHow (lowercase 'w' is deliberate) wants to be the Wikipedia of how-to guides. And, as of a couple years ago, it had over 150,000 articles and north of 35 million visitors a month. But just like Wikipedia or any other wiki-based community, there will always be a problem of quality control. Take, for example, today's amazing deep internet find, the wikiHow article on how to stop a wedding.

Read More

Comments [4]

On The Media

TLDR #24 - The Million Dollar Homepage

Monday, May 05, 2014

In 2005, Alex Tew was a 21-year-old entrepreneur who wanted to make a million dollars before college. The only problem was he had literally nothing of value to sell. So he made The Million Dollar Homepage -- possibly the most ambitiously garish website ever created.

Read More

Comment

On The Media

#24 - The Million Dollar Homepage

Thursday, May 01, 2014

In 2005, Alex Tew was a high school entrepreneur who wanted to make a million dollars before college. So he created perhaps the most ridiculous website ever to grace the Internet.

Read More

Comments [4]

On The Media

How Can You Parody Buzzfeed?

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Yesterday, the Onion told the New York Business Journal that it would be producing a parody of sites like Buzzfeed and Upworthy called "Clickhole." Sure, those sites are ripe for a takedown, but how do you parody sites that are already basically self-parody? Here are 20 ways that will astound you.

Read More

Comment

On The Media

Band Makes the World's Most Difficult To Access Album, But It's Still Pretty Cool

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Getting attention for your music in the internet age requires a lot of flair, a bit of ingenuity, and maybe some performance art.

Read More

Comments [3]

On The Media

TLDR #23 - A Bitcoin Story for People Who Don't Care About Bitcoin

Sunday, April 27, 2014

When Wired reporter Andy Greenberg read Newsweek's cover story claiming to have found mysterious Bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto, he was disappointed. Not so much that the mystery had been solved, but that the answer to the search was not all that interesting. But then, as the Newsweek started getting picked apart, he got a tip about another possible Bitcoin creator: a very ill, very brilliant cryptographer named Hal Finney. 

Andy Greenberg is the author of This Machine Kills Secrets: How WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists Aim to Free the World's Information.

Read More

Comments [1]

On The Media

#23 - A Bitcoin Story for People Who Don't Care About Bitcoin

Thursday, April 24, 2014

When Wired reporter Andy Greenberg read Newsweek's cover story claiming to have found mysterious Bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto, he was disappointed. Not so much that the mystery had been solved, but that the answer to the search was not all that interesting. But then, as the Newsweek started getting picked apart, he got a tip about another possible Bitcoin creator: a very ill, very brilliant cryptographer named Hal Finney. 

Andy Greenberg is the author of This Machine Kills Secrets: How WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists Aim to Free the World's Information.

Donate to Hal Finney's care here

Read More

Comments [1]

On The Media

The Oatmeal and the State of Web Comics

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

I’d like to talk about The Oatmeal. Let’s forget about the the Buzzfeed article for just a minute and discuss The Oatmeal on its own merit.

Read More

Comment

On The Media

Good Work Getting Kicked In the Head There, Pal

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

This is how the internet handles celebrity, unless of course you're a cat.

Read More

Comment

On The Media

TLDR #22 - What Happens When You Tell The Whole Internet Your Password

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Earlier this week, a commenter named Y. Woodman Brown posted his online passwords in the Washington Post comments section to show just how little his online security mattered to him. It was quickly picked up by the press as an example of online security hubris. Naturally, we had to find him. Alex talks to Y. Woodman Brown and the person who hijacked his Twitter account after the passwords were posted.

Read More

Comment

On The Media

TLDR #22 - What Happens When You Tell The Whole Internet Your Password

Friday, April 18, 2014

Earlier this week, a commenter named Y. Woodman Brown posted his online passwords in the Washington Post comments section to show just how little his online security mattered to him. It was quickly picked up by the press as an example of online security hubris. Naturally, we had to find him. Alex talks to Y. Woodman Brown and the person who hijacked his Twitter account after the passwords were posted.

Read More

Comment

On The Media

#22 - What Happens When You Tell The Whole Internet Your Password

Friday, April 18, 2014

Not really.

Read More

Comments [5]

On The Media

Field Recordings From a Virtual World

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Triple A video game titles (meaning the ones that cost hundreds of millions of dollars and have huge launches) are always trying to push for greater and greater verisimilitude. This is one of the reasons that there is a new round of consoles every 7 years or so, and why sound design in games is ever evolving to better evoke a sense of place. These audio environments are now interesting enough that at least one person has decided to record these habitats for posterity.

Read More

Comment

On The Media

TLDR #21 - There Is No Such Thing As Silence

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Continuing our expose into the very hush-hush world of Silence, we look at an app that promises to deliver you four minutes and thirty-three seconds of silence. PJ talks to Larry Larson, who helped design the 4'33" app.

 

Read More

Comment

On The Media

#21 - There Is No Such Thing As Silence

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Continuing our expose into the very hush-hush world of Silence, we look at an app that promises to deliver you four minutes and thirty-three seconds of silence. PJ talks to Larry Larson, who helped design the 4'33" app.

Read More

Comments [1]

On The Media

Hunting For YouTube's Saddest Comments

Friday, April 04, 2014

YouTube's infamous for having one of the worst comment sections on the internet. There's no reason to ever read them. Unless you’re writer & filmmaker Mark Slutsky.

Comments [1]

On The Media

#20 - Silence

Thursday, April 03, 2014

Update: Vulfpeck received an email from Spotify asking the band to remove "Sleepify" from Spotify. See our update here.

A band called Vulfpeck has asked fans to stream an entire album of silence on Spotify while they sleep, so the band can use the royalties to tour without charging for their shows. So far, the scheme has worked. We talk to Vulfpeck's Jack Stratton about hustling as a musician on the internet.

Read More

Comments [1]