Privacy

On The Media

Safe Harbor No More

Friday, October 16, 2015

A big decision from Europe's highest court offers some hope for the future... of privacy. 

On The Media

Porn Politik

Friday, October 16, 2015

A requiem for Playboy's nudes. Plus: Bernie Sanders versus the media, a major privacy case in Europe, and more.

On The Media

That Facebook Disclaimer? Ignore It.

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

You've probably seen the declaration of privacy status making the rounds on Facebook. Trouble is, the post doesn't actually do anything. It's a hoax, and an old one at that.
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On The Media

The Danger Of Reading The News

Friday, August 21, 2015

The Committee to Protect Journalists' Joel Simon says many media organizations are putting readers in danger by publishing without encryption. 

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On The Media

An American "Right To Be Forgotten?"

Friday, August 21, 2015

It takes little effort to make an impression online. But erasing that impression can be impossible. Privacy watchdog John Simpson on the need for a "right to be forgotten" in the US.

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On The Media

Lies and Spies

Friday, August 21, 2015

Media scapegoats for the tragedy of Hurricane Katrina, imagining a Trump presidency, and the NSA's "house philosopher."

On The Media

This Quack Don't Track

Friday, July 10, 2015

DuckDuckGo, a search engine that doesn't collect your personal information, surges in popularity in the wake of the Snowden revelations.

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On The Media

This Fake Identity Generator Wants You to Think About How to Use Fake Identity Generators

Friday, September 19, 2014

There’s a new tool available for all your temporary false identity needs: fakena.me.
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On The Media

Apple Will No Longer Let The Cops Into Your Phone

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Apple CEO Tim Cook has announced that their new operating system makes it impossible for the company to give cops access to its users phones. 
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On The Media

Google Plus Dropped Its Real Name Policy

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Three years after launch, Google Plus users can use (almost) whatever fake name they want.

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On The Media

Online Agitprop! Everyone's Doing It!

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

On the most recent TLDR, I spoke to Max Seddon, foreign correspondent for Buzzfeed, about some recently unearthed documents that show a massive online pro-Russia propaganda effort with ties to The Kremlin

In that interview, Max made it clear that Russia is far from the only government that does this sort of opinion influencing, citing an AP report from a couple months ago about US efforts to sway public opinion in Cuba by creating its own "fake twitter." from the interview:

USAID set up an entire fake social network for cuban people to get around all the internet filters to Cuba that was meant to create some sort of thing that they could use to influence popular opinion in Cuba, which is closed off to the US, and it's very difficult to do well. because On the internet, people are smart, it's very easy to compare things, and use multiple sources of information and come to the right conclusions. They can tell when something is fake.

On Monday, Glenn Greenwald's The Intercept produced another example of this governmental internet meddling, this time from Britain's Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ). 

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On The Media

Do Not Track Declared DOA

Thursday, May 22, 2014

A few years ago, there was a strong initiative to create a "Do Not Track" option on the internet, which would keep advertisers from following you from website to website, watching your every browsing and spending move. The hope was that with a single browser option, consumers could block advertisers from following them around the web. On the Media even did a relatively lengthy look at the initiative as proposed by the FTC in 2010.

three and a half years later, the Do Not Track initiative looks like an ambitious, but spectacular failure.

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On The Media

All The Worst People Would Like the Internet To Forget Them

Friday, May 16, 2014

A child pornographer; a disgraced politician; an attempted murderer. These are the first people who've shown up in the wake of an E.U. court ruling, to get information about themselves removed from the internet.

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On The Media

Not-So-Private Metadata

Friday, March 21, 2014

The NSA has defended its controversial surveillance program by arguing that it just collects metadata, and therefore doesn't violate the privacy of individual Americans. But computer scientists at Stanford Security Lab have conducted their own simulation of the NSA's program, and found the metadata to be inherently revealing. Bob speaks with Jonathan Mayer, one of the researchers on the project, about how much can be learned just from the numbers.

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On The Media

Company Starts Offering Anti-Google Glass Recognition Services

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Google Glass has been crazily divisive in San Francisco, where businesses are banning its usage and fights have erupted over people who are wearing it. A company called Reputation Management Consultants says it has found an elegant solution - Anti Glass, a service which will stymie people from using the device to look you up online.

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On The Media

My Detainment Story or: How I Learned To Stop Feeling Safe In My Own Country and Hate Border Agents

Friday, February 28, 2014

Back in September, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman, her family, and her friends were detained for hours by US Customs and Border Protection on their way home from Canada. Everyone being held was a US citizen, and no one received an explanation. Sarah tells the story of their detainment, and her difficulty getting any answers from one of the least transparent agencies in the country.

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On The Media

Invasive Cavity Search at the Border

Friday, February 28, 2014

"Jane Doe" is a 54-year old US citizen who was crossing into the US at the Juarez/El Paso border when agents took her aside for secondary screening. The screening ended up being 6 hours of invasive cavity searches—which yielded nothing and left her traumatized. Bob speaks with Laura Schauer Ives, an ACLU attorney for Jane Doe about what happened at the border that day.

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On The Media

Device Searches at the Border

Friday, February 28, 2014

The border is a legal gray area where the same constitutional protections one expects inside the country don't necessarily apply. When graduate student Pascal Abidor had his electronic devices searched and seized at the border back in 2010, he filed lawsuit against the federal government. But in December, a federal judge upheld the government's right to search travelers' devices at the border without a warrant. Brooke speaks with Pascal about his experience at the border and the lawsuit.

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On The Media

A Stranger Can Find Out Where You Are By Getting You To Open An Email

Monday, February 10, 2014

It's not hard to imagine a situation where this plug-in, called Streak, could be badly abused.
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On The Media

4.6 Million Snapchat Accounts Have Leaked And It's Actually Not That Important.

Thursday, January 02, 2014

4.6 million Snapchat usernames and their associated phone numbers were leaked this week.  (If you use the service, there’re a few single serving sites where you can check to see if your information’s out there.)

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