Privacy

On The Media

Not-So-Private Metadata

Friday, March 21, 2014

The NSA has defended its controversial surveillance program by arguing that it just collects metadata, and therefore doesn't violate the privacy of individual Americans. But computer scientists at Stanford Security Lab have conducted their own simulation of the NSA's program, and found the metadata to be inherently revealing. Bob speaks with Jonathan Mayer, one of the researchers on the project, about how much can be learned just from the numbers.

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On The Media

Company Starts Offering Anti-Google Glass Recognition Services

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Google Glass has been crazily divisive in San Francisco, where businesses are banning its usage and fights have erupted over people who are wearing it. A company called Reputation Management Consultants says it has found an elegant solution - Anti Glass, a service which will stymie people from using the device to look you up online.

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On The Media

My Detainment Story or: How I Learned To Stop Feeling Safe In My Own Country and Hate Border Agents

Friday, February 28, 2014

Back in September, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman, her family, and her friends were detained for hours by US Customs and Border Protection on their way home from Canada. Everyone being held was a US citizen, and no one received an explanation. Sarah tells the story of their detainment, and her difficulty getting any answers from one of the least transparent agencies in the country.

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On The Media

Invasive Cavity Search at the Border

Friday, February 28, 2014

"Jane Doe" is a 54-year old US citizen who was crossing into the US at the Juarez/El Paso border when agents took her aside for secondary screening. The screening ended up being 6 hours of invasive cavity searches—which yielded nothing and left her traumatized. Bob speaks with Laura Schauer Ives, an ACLU attorney for Jane Doe about what happened at the border that day.

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On The Media

Device Searches at the Border

Friday, February 28, 2014

The border is a legal gray area where the same constitutional protections one expects inside the country don't necessarily apply. When graduate student Pascal Abidor had his electronic devices searched and seized at the border back in 2010, he filed lawsuit against the federal government. But in December, a federal judge upheld the government's right to search travelers' devices at the border without a warrant. Brooke speaks with Pascal about his experience at the border and the lawsuit.

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On The Media

A Stranger Can Find Out Where You Are By Getting You To Open An Email

Monday, February 10, 2014

This afternoon, I stumbled across this free Gmail plug-in called Streak. If you send someone an email, Streak will tell you if they opened it, when they opened it, and, most creepily, where they were when they opened it. 

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On The Media

4.6 Million Snapchat Accounts Have Leaked And It's Actually Not That Important.

Thursday, January 02, 2014

4.6 million Snapchat usernames and their associated phone numbers were leaked this week.  (If you use the service, there’re a few single serving sites where you can check to see if your information’s out there.)

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On The Media

How much is your privacy worth? About five bucks.

Friday, December 27, 2013

There’s a $16 billion market out there for app developers willing to offer consumers their privacy back.

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On The Media

Journey to the Center of the NSA

Friday, December 20, 2013

Last Sunday's 60 Minutes profile of the NSA was almost universally reviled. But 60 Minutes is not the only outlet that has spent time at the agency's headquarters in Maryland. Brooke talks to Daniel Drezner, who wrote about his trip to the NSA's headquarters and the agency's new PR push for Foreign Policy.

Shigeto - Ringleader

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On The Media

No One Outside the NSA Seems Particularly Happy with the 60 Minutes NSA Story

Monday, December 16, 2013

The piece doesn't include any on camera interviews with critics of the NSA, and interviews with NSA employees were overseen by a team of minders.

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On The Media

Why Facebook Messenger Wants Access To Your Phone's Microphone

Friday, November 29, 2013

There's an Infowars story that's beginning to circulate widely about a seemingly very Orwellian move by Facebook. 

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On The Media

The US Keeps Getting Caught Spying on Allies

Thursday, October 24, 2013

On Monday morning, I wrote that allegations the NSA had intercepted French phone calls weren't actually very important. My logic was that allies spy on each other routinely. When they get caught, there’s a lot of ceremonial outrage and apology that amounts to very little.

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On The Media

The NSA Probably Has Your Buddy List

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

The Washington Post reports that the NSA harvests the email addresses and contact lists of millions of people globally, many of them Americans. They don't have permission from the email providers to do this, the agency just snatches the data as its transmitted across the world.

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On The Media

Facebook Reduces Its Privacy Options (Again)

Friday, October 11, 2013

Yesterday, Facebook announced that users who've asked for their timelines to be unsearchable will now searchable. 

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On The Media

The Owner of An Encrypted Email Service Says "No" to the FBI (In a tiny, tiny font)

Thursday, October 03, 2013

Yesterday, a federal judge unsealed records from the case of Lavabit, the privacy-first email service used by Edward Snowden, versus the government. It's a compelling read, and it's a rare story because it shows a company refusing to comply with demands to give up a customer's privacy. 

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On The Media

California Bans Revenge Porn

Wednesday, October 02, 2013

Last night, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law a bill that makes revenge porn illegal. Typically, attempts by well-meaning lawmakers to legislate the internet don't end well. These laws often end up restricting free speech without actually stopping the activity they're meant to. But if you're going to pass a law like this, California's looks pretty good. 

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On The Media

India's Attempt to ID Every Indian

Friday, September 27, 2013

In a 2009 book called Imagining India, Indian tech billionaire Nandan Nilekani imagined a way to address India’s most vexing problems of corruption, poverty and lack of social services – a unique ID number for every Indian. 4 years later, India has undertaken the biggest ID program in human history. It’s called Aadhaar, and Nilekani oversees it. But trying to register 1.2 billion people, many for the first time, comes with serious privacy and data-collection concerns. OTM reporter Jamie York went to India to speak with Nilekani and lawyer Malavika Jayaram about the risk and reward of identifying every Indian.

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On The Media

My Detainment Story or: How I learned to Stop Feeling Safe in My Own Country and Hate Border Agents*

Friday, September 20, 2013

Earlier this month, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman, her family, and her friends were detained for hours by US Customs and Border Protection on their way home from Canada. Everyone being held was a US citizen, and no one received an explanation. Sarah tells the story of their detainment, and her difficulty getting any answers from one of the least transparent agencies in the country.

William Tyler - Country of Illusion

[Hi folks. This piece has been getting a lot of traffic, so we wanted to direct you to more of Sarah's enormously good reporting if you're interested. A nice place to start is her firsthand account of what it was like to coordinate information for anti-Gaddafi rebels, or her profile last month of the newly launched Al-Jazeera America. Or you can just go here for all of her OTM appearances.]

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On The Media

What Does the Government Want with LinkedIn's Data?

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Yesterday, LinkedIn's general counsel published a letter to the site's users expressing frustration that the company's not allowed to disclose the number of national security-related data requests it receives each year. 

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