Privacy

On The Media

Warrantless Device Searches at US Borders

Friday, September 13, 2013

There has long been a quiet exception to the constitutional protection against warrantless search and seizure. It happens routinely at every US border, where federal agents are free to confiscate--and copy--contents of hard drives, cell phones, and other electronic data. Bob talks to New York Times contributor Susan Stellin, who broke a story this week with new insights into how the US government exploits the loophole to target journalists, activists and who knows who else.

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On The Media

"We Post Nothing About Our Daughter Online"

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

This morning Slate published an interesting essay by Amy Webb, where she talks about how she and her husband have decided, since their young daughter's birth, to keep all traces of her off the internet.

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On The Media

Our Privacy Delusions

Friday, June 14, 2013

We all claim to want privacy online, but that desire is rarely reflected in our online behavior. In a story that originally aired in January, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman looks into the futile attempts we make to protect our digital identities.

Johannes Brahms - Violin Concerto op.77 in D Major

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On The Media

Meet Strongbox

Friday, May 17, 2013

This week, to help insulate journalists and their sources from government surveillance, The New Yorker launched a new service. It’s called Strongbox, and it enables people to send messages and documents to journalists anonymously and untraceably. It was developed from code created by programmers Kevin Poulsen and the late Aaron Swartz. The New Yorker's Nicholas Thompson explains to Bob how it works.

 

Music: John Lurie - Horse Guitar

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On The Media

Meet Grindr: A Gaydar in Every Pocket

Friday, April 12, 2013

Grindr is a phone app that allows gay men to find other users based on their proximity. Brooke speaks with Jaime Woo, author of Meet Grindr: How One App changed the Way We Connect about the app's effect on our understanding of privacy.

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On The Media

A Casual, Anonymous Interview

Friday, April 12, 2013

OTM producer Doug Anderson fires up Grindr and meets up with another guy for a casual, anonymous...interview.

Fred Astaire - I'm Putting All My Eggs In One Basket

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On The Media

Joel Simkhai, Grindr-in-Chief

Friday, April 12, 2013

Brooke talks to Grindr founder Joel Simkhai about what inspired the app and how it manages to make money.

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On The Media

Facebook's New Social Search

Friday, January 25, 2013

Facebook has introduced a new search tool called social graph search, which lets users search across the Facebook database by users' interests. Privacy advocates aren't pleased with the new feature, arguing that it makes information about users too easy to find. Bob talks to Tom Scott, who has been given early access to the feature and has been publicizing some of his searches. 

Four Tet - 0181

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On The Media

Newspaper Publishes a Map Showing Where Gun Owners Live

Friday, January 11, 2013

Following the school massacre in nearby Connecticut, a New York state paper published a map showing the names and addresses of handgun permit owners in its readership area — all except for one county, where local officials have refused to provide the paper with the information. This decision violates explicit New York State law, but has a supporter in New York state Senator Greg Ball, who tells Bob why he's supporting Putnam County officials.

Yo La Tengo - Stupid Things

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On The Media

Privacy and Gun Control

Friday, January 11, 2013

On Thursday, Vice President Biden sketched out early hints of what gun control reform might look like. One potential reform concerns something that you might mistakenly assume already exists: a central database of gun transactions in the US, maintained by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms. The NRA has blocked all such efforts in the past. New York Times reporter Sheryl Gay Stolberg tells Bob why the ATF's record-keeping on gun sales is actually incredibly antiquated. 

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On The Media

The Privacy Show

Friday, January 04, 2013

A special hour on privacy - license plate readers, national security letters, surveilling yourself so the government doesn't have to, and OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman on just how much we misunderstand our privacy online.

On The Media

The NCTC: Obama's "Pre-Crime Squad"?

Friday, January 04, 2013

Last March, the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) was granted unprecedented power to collect data on ordinary U.S. citizens, data like flight records or lists of casino employees. Critics have likened the NCTC to the "Pre-Crime Squad" in the movie "Minority Report." Wall Street Journal reporter Julia Angwin talks with Bob about this dramatic shift in the intelligence community's power over US citizens.

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On The Media

Our Privacy Delusions

Friday, January 04, 2013

We all claim to want privacy online, but that desire is rarely reflected in our online behavior. OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman looks into the futile attempts we make to protect our digital identities.

 

Johannes Brahms - Violin Concerto op.77 in D Major

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On The Media

Data Collection Trade-Offs

Friday, January 04, 2013

In Philip Bobbitt's 2008 book Terror and Consent: The Wars for the 21st Century, he argues that data collection is an incredibly useful tool that’s fundamentally misunderstood by the public. Brooke talks with Bobbitt about that and the way the media and public also misunderstand warrants. Bobbitt, law professor at Columbia University is author most recently of The Garments of Court and Palace: Machiavelli and the World That He Made.

 

Build Buildings - Let's Go

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On The Media

"If You’ve Got Nothing to Hide, You’ve Got Nothing to Fear"

Friday, January 04, 2013

Here's a common refrain in privacy discussions: “If you’ve got nothing to hide, you’ve got nothing to fear.” There's also Google’s then-CEO Eric Schmidt famously saying:  "If you have something that you don't want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place." Brooke speaks with George Washington University law professor Daniel Solove who says those types of arguments misunderstand privacy entirely.

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On The Media

The Art of Self-Surveillance

Friday, January 04, 2013

In 2002, artist and professor Hasan Elahi spent six months being interrogated off and on by the FBI as a suspected terrorist. In response to this experience, he created Tracking Transience, a website that makes his every move available to the FBI - and everybody else. In a segment that originally aired in November of 2011, Brooke talks to Elahi about the project.

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On The Media

License Plate Readers and Your Privacy

Friday, January 04, 2013

Police car mounted license plate readers collect date, time and location information and are used by law enforcement around the country to help catch criminals. But when Minneapolis Star Tribune reporter Eric Roper filed a Freedom of Information request for information on his own car, he got a lot more than he bargained for. In a segment that originally aired in August of 2012, Bob talks to Roper about how Minneapolis police and agencies across the country deal with this potentially sensitive location information.

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On The Media

Will the Petraeus Scandal Be Good for Privacy?

Friday, November 16, 2012

Privacy is among the many issues raised by the Petraeus affair. We don’t know exactly what the FBI did, or what sort of legal barriers they had to surmount to get access. Reporter Peter Maass wrote that an unexpected consequence of Petreaus’s fall is that we all might learn a little more about how the FBI operates. Brooke spoke with Maass about an unlikely connection between the Petraeus scandal and former Supreme Court Nominee Robert Bork. 

Johan Borger - Goodnight My Friend

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On The Media

The Facebook Show

Friday, October 26, 2012

An Austrian man who got Facebook to give him everything they had on him, a writer whose rapist friended her on Facebook, the value of a "Like."

On The Media

Enforcing Online Privacy Laws

Friday, July 27, 2012

With every new online service we participate in—from mobile banking to the latest social networking site—more and more of our personal information is being stored online—and for privacy advocates, that is a scary trade off. Now the state of California is taking steps to make sure that this consumer data stays protected, with the creation of a new Privacy Enforcement and Protection Unit. Brooke speaks with California Attorney General Kamala Harris about enforcing privacy rules.

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