Satire

On The Media

Facebook Attempts to Teach Its Users To Recognize Satire - With A "Satire" Tag

Monday, August 18, 2014

The old "The-Onion-being-mistaken-as-real-news" rubric is now so common at this point as to be mundane. In fact, the website "literally unbelievable" exists solely catalog unsuspecting Facebookers falling for The Onion's headlines. And The Onion is no longer the only site that traffics in parody that gets passed off as real news, it's just the best known, and most clearly satirical. Sites like The Daily Currant and The National Report - both less clearly satire and significantly less funny than The Onion - regularly get picked up as real news as well. Facebook is running a test on some users where it attempts to more clearly demarcate articles from The Onion as satire

Read More

Comments [6]

On The Media

Silliness and Moral Indignation

Friday, July 25, 2014

Brooke examines how comedians like Jon Stewart, John Oliver, and Stephen Colbert make us laugh by combining silliness and moral indignation.  

Comments [5]

On The Media

The Most Popular Satire Show in Israel

Friday, July 25, 2014

It’s been a violent, sad week. Sometimes the only way to wring anything positive out of it all is through the transformative power of comedy. Brooke talks with Sharon Taicher, a writer at Eretz Nehederet, a satire show watched by 1 out of 8 Israelis.

Comment

On The Media

Meet The Hummus, A Fake News Site for Muslim-Americans

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

What’s so funny about being Muslim in America?  Depending on who you ask, quite a bit.  Inspired by the scope of Al-Jazeera and the irreverence of The Onion, three young Muslim-American men have launched their own culturally flavored fake news publication:  The Hummus.

Read More

Comment

On The Media

Satirists and Syria

Friday, September 06, 2013

On the Media's own PJ Vogt wrote a story for our new blog TLDR about the difficulty outlets like The Onion and The Daily Show are having finding humor in the situation in Syria as it becomes more complex. Bob talks to PJ about what the outlets are doing wrong, and how they can improve.

Comments [9]

On The Media

Living by the Trends in the New York Times Style Section

Friday, December 07, 2012

The New York Times isn't just a source for news; its also the authority on the latest cultural trends—at least, so says Slate contributor and chronically un-hip Brooklynite Justin Peters. He recently used the Times' Style section as a blueprint for living the trendiest life possible. Brooke asks Justin about the results of this "scientific" experiment.

Comments [3]

On The Media

Political Satire in South Africa

Friday, December 30, 2011

Pieter-Dirk Uys and Jonathan Shapiro are satirists with different mediums, but a similar mission. Shapiro is a political cartoonist who publishes under the name Zapiro. Uys is a performer whose character Evita Bezuidenhout is billed as the most famous white woman in South Africa. Bob talks to the two about their work under apartheid, when their criticism of the government was as constant as it was ruthless.

Vusi Mahlasela - Two Birds

Comment

On The Media

Cow Clicker

Friday, November 18, 2011

Video game designer Ian Bogost creates 'serious' video games designed to make you think. One of those games, however, has become an unlikely success. It's called 'Cow Clicker' and though it started as a parody of Farmville-style social networking games - it came to be taken very seriously by a group of gamers who found it endlessly fun. OTM producer PJ Vogt reports on what happens when your creations take on a life of their own.

Comments [4]

On The Media

Political Satire in South Africa

Friday, October 21, 2011

Pieter-Dirk Uys and Jonathan Shapiro are satirists with different mediums, but a similar mission. Shapiro is a political cartoonist who publishes under the name Zapiro. Uys is a performer whose character Evita Bezuidenhout is billed as the most famous white woman in South Africa. Bob talks to the two about their work under apartheid, when their criticism of the government was as constant as it was ruthless.

Vusi Mahlasela – "Two Birds"

Comments [1]