Scandal

On The Media

Lenny Dykstra's Downfall

Friday, November 29, 2013

Former baseball player Lenny "Dude" Dykstra has become a seemingly endless fount of stories for sports reporters who cover scandal. He's been arrested for grand theft auto and drug possession, declared bankruptcy, and been accused of bouncing a check to a prostitute. Philadelphia sports writer Frank Fitzpatrick has been covering Dykstra since before his fall from grace, and in an interview that originally aired in 2011, he talks to Bob about how sports writers can be complicit in the bad behavior of the athletes they cover.

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On The Media

The Mayor of Toronto Would Prefer Not to Discuss Whether He Smokes Crack

Friday, May 24, 2013

Late last week, Gawker published a post that achieved something Gawker posts rarely do -- it changed Canadian politics. Gawker’s John Cook alleged that he’d seen a video of Toronto Mayor Rob Ford smoking crack. It's been the lead story in the Canadian press for the past week, but so far the mayor has dismissed the charge and avoided answering any questions from the press. Brooke talks to The Toronto Star's Robyn Doolittle, who's been reporting the story from Toronto, about Ford's ability to disregard the media.

Beastie Boys - Multilateral Nuclear Disarmament

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On The Media

A Week of Scandals, Catholic Whistleblowers, and More

Friday, May 24, 2013

Looking at the media's governmental scandal narrative, an American blog rocks Canadian politics, and whistleblowers in the Catholic Church.

On The Media

The Three-Headed Scandal Monster

Friday, May 24, 2013

Brooke takes a look at the three scandals that have dominated the news cycle for the past couple weeks: the IRS targeting conservative political groups, the DOJ looking through the phone records and email of reporters, and the attack on the diplomatic mission in Benghazi.

Anton Karas - The Third Man Theme

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On The Media

With IRS Scandal, Conservative Bloggers Feel Vindicated

Friday, May 17, 2013

This week saw the resignation of two prominent IRS officials after it was confirmed that the agency targeted conservative nonprofit political groups during the 2012 election. The departures were at least a partial victory for conservative bloggers. They’ve been covering the story for over a year, and they’ve been mostly alone. The Huffington Post’s Michael Calderone tells Bob about the story’s winding path, starting with its origin in the right-wing blogosphere.

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On The Media

Petraeus's Relationship with Journalists

Friday, November 16, 2012

Journalists that covered David Petraeus, both in his capacity as a General in Iraq and Afghanistan, and later as the director of the CIA, have done a lot of public soul searching in the wake of his recent scandal. Bob speaks to international investigative reporter Jon Lee Anderson about what he sees as the media's failings in covering Petraeus.

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On The Media

Former News of the World Reporter Paul McMullan

Friday, December 02, 2011

In the aftermath of the News of the World phone hacking scandal, the British government launched an investigation known as the Leveson Inquiry to look into the practices and ethics of the British press. This week, one of the most shocking testimonies of the inquiry came from former NOTW reporter Paul McMullan. Brooke speaks to McMullan about his testimony and why he thinks deceptive reporting tactics are necessary.

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On The Media

Phone Hacking: A Guide

Friday, November 25, 2011

As the effects from the News of the World phone hacking continue to ripple through Britain, many are still wondering how those journalists and private investigators managed to do it. This may not have been their method, but for WNYC's John Keefe, voicemail hacking was surprisingly easy.  In an interview first aired in July of 2011, he tells Brooke all you need is a computer, a phone number, and $10.

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On The Media

Muted U.S. Public Reaction to British Tabloid Scandal

Friday, July 22, 2011

The U.S. media has been fascinated with the British tabloid phone hacking scandal and its widespread fallout. But according to polling by the Pew Research Center, the public doesn’t share the media’s obsession. Brooke speaks to Pew Research Center President Andrew Kohut, who says that when  the public was asked which story they were following most closely, only 4 percent chose the phone hacking story.

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On The Media

Phone Hacking: A Guide

Friday, July 22, 2011

As the effects from the News of the World phone hacking continue to ripple throughout Britain, many are still wondering how those journalists and private investigators managed to do it.  This may not have been their method, but for WNYC's John Keefe, voicemail hacking was surprisingly (and shockingly) easy.  He tells Brooke all you need is a computer, a phone number, and $10.

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