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Truvada

Friday, July 18, 2014

Truvada is a drug that, taken daily, has been show to prevent HIV infection by as much as 99 percent. Like the polio vaccine, or like the birth control pill, it's a medical breakthrough worthy of massive coverage. Why hasn't there been? Brooke speaks to Rich Juzwiak, a Gawker staff writer, about the drug and what’s holding it back in the media.

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On The Media

Your Morals Depend on Language

Friday, June 20, 2014

Would you sacrifice one person to save the lives of five others? Your answer may depend on whether you consider the problem in your native tongue or a secondary one.

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On The Media

“Climate Change” vs. “Global Warming”

Friday, June 06, 2014

The Environmental Protection Agency recently rolled out the Obama administration’s ambitious proposal to cut carbon pollution from existing power plants 30% by 2030. This proposal could bring renewed worldwide attention to climate change. Trouble is, we still haven’t sorted out how to talk about the issue. Is it “Climate Change” or “Global Warming”? Bob speaks to Anthony Leiserowitz, Director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, and the principal investigator of the new study, “What’s In a Name? Global Warming Versus Climate Change.”

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On The Media

Now You Can Check Your Email From the Moon

Friday, May 30, 2014

Scientists bring wifi to the moon, and the speeds aren't that bad.

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On The Media

What’s a Health Journalist To Do?

Friday, May 23, 2014

Resveratrol is a chemical in red wine that, over the years, has been both heralded as heart healing and dismissed as bogus by the media. While this head-spinning trajectory is the norm in health reporting, it's enough to make health and science reporter Virginia Hughes question her profession. Brooke speaks with Hughes about the perils of reporting on the latest health news.

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On The Media

The Autism Channel

Friday, May 02, 2014

Launched in 2012, The Autism Channel aims covers the whole autism world. Some of the channel's hosts are on the autistic spectrum, and with autism diagnosis soaring, the station has a booming list of potential viewers. In a piece that aired in January 2013, OTM Producer Chris Neary went to West Palm Beach, the home of the channel, to investigate. (You can watch The Autism Channel through a Roku streaming player.)

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On The Media

Battling Bad Science

Friday, May 02, 2014

Stories about new innovations in health appear almost daily in the media, but the claims are frequently overblown, misleading, or completely false. In a TED talk from July, 2011, journalist Ben Goldacre talks about how to spot and avoid bad science.

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On The Media

Beall's List

Friday, May 02, 2014

Some academic journals have embraced a “gold open access model” of publishing, wherein the scholars whose work appears in the journal pay for the privilege. Bob speaks with Jeffrey Beall, an academic librarian at the University of Colorado Denver who has assembled a list of "predatory journals" - journals that may be more interested in profit than academic contributions

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On The Media

Piltdown at 100: A Look Back on Science's Biggest Hoax

Friday, May 02, 2014

A hundred years ago, a human-like skull and ape-like jaw were presented at a special meeting of the Geological Society in London. The so-called "Piltdown Man" became widely accepted as a crucial link in the human evolutionary chain; crucial, that is, until 1953, when the bones were exposed as a total hoax. In an interview from December of last year, Nova Senior Science Editor Evan Hadingham talks to Brooke about this tantalizing example of "scientific skullduggery."

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On The Media

A Vigilante Solution to Texting and Driving

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

A Florida man has been accused of putting a mobile cell phone jammer in his car to stop nearby drivers from distracted driving.

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On The Media

Engineering Intelligence

Friday, April 18, 2014

Despite the technological leaps made in the realm of artificial intelligence, people often object to the idea that the minds of machines can ever replicate the minds of humans. But for engineers, the proof is in the processing. Brooke talks with Stanford lecturer and entrepreneur Jerry Kaplan about how the people who make robots view the field of AI. 

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On The Media

Our Universal Robots

Friday, April 18, 2014

The word 'robot' first appeared in 1920 in Karel Čapek's play, Rossum's Universal Robots. Since then, intelligent machines have starred countless times in novels and films. Brooke talks with professor Jay P. Telotte about the ways our fears and fascinations with robots are reflected in culture. 

Music: Calexico - Attack El Robot! Attack! Special thanks to @bartona104 (Julia Barton) for the suggestion on Twitter!

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On The Media

Google's Robot Brigade

Friday, April 18, 2014

Google has recently scooped up more than a half dozen robot companies. Their specialties range from artificial limbs to 3D machine vision to scurrying insect-bots and humanoid soldiers. But Google has kept mum about why they're acquiring these technologies. Brooke talks with Henrik Christensen, a professor of robotics at Georgia Tech, about what Google might do with its new toys. 

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On The Media

ROBOTS! (and artificial intelligence)

Friday, April 18, 2014

A special theme hour - starring a computer competing against a comedian for laughs, the Army's recruitment chatbot, and Google crushing on robots. 

On The Media

Google Will Now Let You Buy Google Glass (for One Day Only)

Friday, April 11, 2014

Google announced today that they’ll let anybody buy Google Glass, but for one day only. Previously, only a limited number of people were allowed in to Google’s beta test. But next Tuesday, if you’d like, you can plunk down $1,500 for a pair of internet spectacles.

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On The Media

#21 - There Is No Such Thing As Silence

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Continuing our expose into the very hush-hush world of Silence, we look at an app that promises to deliver you four minutes and thirty-three seconds of silence. PJ talks to Larry Larson, who helped design the 4'33" app.

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On The Media

Not All Video Games Cause Aggressive Behavior. Just the Really Crappy Ones.

Tuesday, April 08, 2014

Well if someone had just asked me, I could have told them that - a study has found that video games with frustrating and counter-intuitive controls are more likely to cause aggressive behavior.

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On The Media

Case Closed

Friday, April 04, 2014

A new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) not only presents dire evidence of global warming's impact, it also offers a different narrative about who is at risk, putting humans at the center of the story. Brooke talks with science journalist Cristine Russell about the IPCC's media-ready case.

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On The Media

A Calculator To Tell You How Many Weeks (Or Months, Or Years) You've Spent Watching TV

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

Oh dear. A new online calculator will tell you how many weeks (or months, or years) you've lost to your favorite shows.

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On The Media

How Much Oil Really Spilled?

Friday, March 28, 2014

On the 25th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Southwest Alaska, the media reported, as they have since the disaster happened, that the amount of oil spilled was 11 million gallons. In 2010, Brooke spoke with Riki Ott - a marine toxicologist and author - who explained that the 11 million number is in fact a disputed figure the media have incorrectly adopted.

 

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