Syria

On The Media

The Ever Changing Syria Story

Friday, September 13, 2013

The conversation about American strikes in Syria shifted this week, after Bashar Al-Assad suggested he would surrender his chemical weapons, and President Obama called on Congress to delay a decision on missile strikes. Bob takes a look at this week's Syria developments in the media, including the supposed gaffe by Secretary of State John Kerry that may have allowed the US to avoid going to war.

Andrew Bird - Ophelia Looks Back

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On The Media

Battling media narratives over Syria, a terrible anniversary, and more

Friday, September 13, 2013

A shift in the discussion about air strikes in Syria, a look at civil liberties 12 years after September 11, and why the Internet is obsessed with cats.

On The Media

The Freelancer's War

Friday, September 13, 2013

The Committee to Protect Journalists reports that nearly half of the journalists killed in Syria since the conflict began were freelancers. Several UK based newspapers said they would no longer use freelance journalists in war zones. But, according to documentarian and teacher Richard Pendry, these same newspapers are still hiring freelancers, but setting up hurdles to lower the papers’ liability.

Andrew Pekler - Here Comes the Night

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On The Media

Syria Coverage, Nazi Collaborations with Hollywood, and More

Friday, September 06, 2013

The media's cautious coverage of Syria, a look inside the sordid world of Washington D.C., and the pact between Hollywood and Nazi Germany in the 1930s.

On The Media

Satirists and Syria

Friday, September 06, 2013

On the Media's own PJ Vogt wrote a story for our new blog TLDR about the difficulty outlets like The Onion and The Daily Show are having finding humor in the situation in Syria as it becomes more complex. Bob talks to PJ about what the outlets are doing wrong, and how they can improve.

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On The Media

Iraq Coverage VS. Syria Coverage

Friday, September 06, 2013

Coverage of the proposed military intervention in Syria is attracting inevitable comparisons to the run-up to the Iraq war, which began 10 years ago. But this time around, with Iraq still fresh in the country's collective memory, the media seem to be more careful. Bob speaks to Max Fisher, foreign affairs blogger for the Washington Post, about the media's coverage of Syria, and how the inevitable comparison to Iraq may not be that useful.

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On The Media

Why is Syria Flummoxing American Satirists?

Thursday, September 05, 2013

It's hard to talk about the ideas or politics behind comedy news, because while we all know that they're important and influential, we also know that because they're entertainment, you can't talk seriously about them without sounding like a dummy. So let's sound like dummies for a moment!

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On The Media

Mapping Gun Owners, International Journalists Fight Censorship, and More

Friday, January 11, 2013

The ATF's desire for a central database of gun transactions, journalists fight for the right to report on India's rape trial, an interview with 56 Up director Michael Apted, and Chinese journalists strike after the government censored an Op-Ed.

On The Media

Al Jazeera and the Qatari Government's Editorial Influence

Friday, January 11, 2013

In December, Al Jazeera Berlin correspondent Aktham Suliman left the news outlet, saying he felt its primary funder, the Qatari government, exerted too much influence over Al Jazeera's coverage. Suliman is just the latest in a string of resignations from Al Jazeera in protest of editorial interference. In an interview from August of last year, Bob talks to blogger and political commentator Sultan Al Qassemi about what he sees as the problems with Al Jazeera's coverage of ongoing fighting in Syria.

Yo La Tengo - I'll Be Around

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On The Media

Arabic Language TV And Covering Syria

Friday, August 24, 2012

In Foreign Policy, political commentator Sultan Al Qassemi made the case that Al Jazeera and Al Arabiya are, for political reasons, misrepresenting the reality on the ground in Syria. Bob speaks with Qassemi, who outlines what he sees as the problems with the coverage of the region's most important news sources.

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On The Media

Syrian Rebels Appeal to Donors Through Video

Friday, July 27, 2012

With limited foreign media on the ground in Syria, our picture of the conflict is being assembled largely through citizen videos posted online and Syrian government television. Added to the mix is a new type of video made by rebels, aimed at getting funding from donors abroad. Brooke speaks to NPR Middle East correspondent Deb Amos about making videos in order to get weapons.

The Weeknd - Thursday

 

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On The Media

Public Relations for Dictators

Friday, June 15, 2012

The New York Times reported this week that the Assad family employs Western PR firms to polish its image for the rest of the world. A few years ago, Harper’s contributing editor Ken Silverstein went undercover and approached PR firms as a fake representative of a tyrant who needed to improve his image. He talks to Bob about what he learned.

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On The Media

The Evolving Propaganda War in Syria

Friday, June 15, 2012

When the conflict in Syria began it was relatively simple - a tyrant versus his people. After more than a year, it's become much more complicated. Bob speaks with BBC Middle East Bureau Chief Paul Danahar who recently returned from Syria about the propaganda both sides of the conflict are putting out and the usefulness of having more journalists on the ground in Syria.

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On The Media

Balancing Advocacy and Accuracy

Friday, June 01, 2012

In a Washington Post op-ed last month, Senator Joseph Lieberman spoke of “horrific human rights abuses perpetrated daily, including the widespread and deliberate use of rape and other sexual violence as weapons of war.” Lauren Wolfe, director of the Women Under Siege Project, which has curated a map plotting instances of sexual violence in Syria, talks with Brooke about trying to check the senator's claim and the difficulty of verifying claims of rape in a war-zone.


The Chieftains - The Stone

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On The Media

Western Technology in Oppressive Regimes

Friday, May 04, 2012

Much of the hardware and software used by oppressive regimes to monitor foreign dissidents is manufactured in the west. Margaret Coker, Middle East Correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, talks to Bob about President Obama's recent Executive Order banning the sale of this technology to Iran and Syria.

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On The Media

Reporters Unwittingly Exposing Sources

Friday, April 27, 2012

Journalists have become increasingly reliant on digital technology in their work, but weak or nonexistent digital security measures open their sources to risk of exposure. Brooke speaks to journalist Matthieu Aikins about the need for reporters to take more precautions to protect their digital information, especially in conflict areas.

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On The Media

Tweeting Graphic Videos From Syria

Friday, February 10, 2012

The situation in Syria is worsening, with estimates of over 5000 dead and the regime of President Bashar Al Assad showing no signs of backing down. With a virtual media blackout in the country, videos posted to YouTube and Facebook are providing some of the only glimpses into the atrocities taking place on the ground.  Bob speaks to NPR senior strategist Andy Carvin and Sky News digital news editor Neal Mann about walking the line between conveying the immensity of the brutality without traumatizing audiences.

The Chieftans - The Stone

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On The Media

Arab Governments No Longer Ignoring Regional Atrocities

Friday, November 18, 2011

The regime of Syrian President Bashar Al Assad is becoming increasingly isolated.  Eight months into the Syrian uprising, with estimates of more than 3,500 people killed, the Arab League voted to suspend Syria's membership in the organization.  Bob speaks with Foreign Policy blogger Marc Lynch, who says the idea that Assad would lose legitimacy among fellow Arab leaders for killing his own people may seem obvious, but it is actually a revolutionary shift in the regional mentality.

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