Transparency

On The Media

Section 317

Friday, April 04, 2014

The Supreme Court ruled this week to raise the limit for individual campaign contributions from $123,000 to $3.6 million dollars. Limits are in place to prevent deep-pocketed donors from corrupting the democratic process, which includes political advertising. Brooke speaks to former FCC Commissioner Michael J. Copps about Section 317 of the Communications Act, the FCC's as-yet-enforced dictum that we are entitled to know by whom we are being persuaded. 

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On The Media

Shedding Light on DHS

Friday, February 28, 2014

Getting information from Customs and Border Protection and the Department of Homeland Security is not just difficult for journalists and private citizens—even members of Congress have a hard time getting answers. Brooke speaks with Representative Beto O'Rourke of Texas' 16th District about the oversight needed to ensure more transparency from DHS.

And a crowdsourcing project to Shed Light on DHS!

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On The Media

Investigating Use of Force at the Border

Friday, February 28, 2014

A recent investigation from The Arizona Republic found that since 2005, at least 42 people have been killed by US Customs and Border Protection agents. But getting information about those incidents is no easy task. Bob speaks with Bob Ortega, one of the reporters behind the investigation, about the difficulty in getting answers on use of force at the border.

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On The Media

Secrecy at the Border

Friday, February 28, 2014

A look at the suspension of rights at the border, murkiness of border policies, and lack of answers from the federal government.

On The Media

My Detainment Story or: How I Learned To Stop Feeling Safe In My Own Country and Hate Border Agents

Friday, February 28, 2014

Back in September, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman, her family, and her friends were detained for hours by US Customs and Border Protection on their way home from Canada. Everyone being held was a US citizen, and no one received an explanation. Sarah tells the story of their detainment, and her difficulty getting any answers from one of the least transparent agencies in the country.

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On The Media

Fighting for Information from DHS

Friday, December 06, 2013

The Electronic Privacy Information Center just won a lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security, requiring the federal agency to release documents about the so-called "internet kill switch." Bob speaks with EPIC's Julia Horwitz about the lengthy battle with DHS, and the difficulty in getting information out of the notoriously opaque agency.

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On The Media

Listeners Trying to Shed Light on DHS

Friday, December 06, 2013

In October, OTM launched a "Shed Light on DHS" tool, which connects constituents with their representatives in Congress in order to ask for more transparency from the Department of Homeland Security. Brooke speaks with some OTM listeners who have used the tool, Philip Elmer-Dewitt, Alison Dalton Smith and Ehud Gavron, about their experiences.

Oddisee - All Along The River

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On The Media

Shed Light on DHS!

Friday, October 25, 2013

As we've discussed here and here on OTM, the Department of Homeland Security has been unresponsive to journalists' questions about policies related to the rights and treatments of American citizens at airports and border ports of entry into the U.S. As former Congressman Lee Hamilton told Brooke, the best way to get answers from DHS is for constituents to put pressure on their elected representatives. And now you can use the tool below to do just that!

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On The Media

A New Tool to Help Shed Light on DHS

Friday, October 25, 2013

Former Congressman Lee Hamilton told Brooke that the best way to get answers from the Department of Homeland Security is for constituents to put pressure on their representatives in Congress. Now the Data News Team at WNYC has created a tool to help do just that. Bob speaks to John Keefe, WNYC's Senior Editor for Data News and Journalism Technology, about the new tool, and how listeners can use it to do their own investigative reporting.

Acid Pauli - MST

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On The Media

Reporting Around DHS Opacity

Friday, October 25, 2013

When OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman tried getting answers from the Department of Homeland Security for her border detainment story, she experienced first hand how opaque the behemoth federal agency can be with reporters. But her experience wasn't unique. Brooke speaks with New York Times contributor Susan Stellin and Rio Grande Valley correspondent for the Associated Press Christopher Sherman--two journalists that regularly come in contact with DHS and its various agencies--about just how difficult it can be to get information.

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On The Media

Obama and the Press, a Wikileaks movie, and Brooke Talks with an iPhone.

Friday, October 11, 2013

A close look at government transparency under President Obama. Also, Sherlock Holmes Becomes Julian Assange and a declassification engine.  

On The Media

The Obama administration and the Press

Friday, October 11, 2013

This week, the Committee to Protect Journalists released a study profiling the so-called transparency president's unprecedented war on leaks and refusal to grant journalists access. Bob talks to study author Len Downie about how the Obama administration's policies on the press are having a chilling effect on reporting.

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On The Media

Which committee is responsible for providing oversight at our borders?

Friday, September 27, 2013

Bob reads listener responses to producer Sarah Abdurrhaman’s piece“My Detainment Story or: How I learned to Stop Feeling Safe in My Own Country and Hate Border Agents.”  Brooke talks to former congressman Lee H. Hamilton, co-author of a recent report calling for reform of the Department of Homeland Security, about how the DHS can, and should, work better.

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On The Media

My Detainment Story or: How I learned to Stop Feeling Safe in My Own Country and Hate Border Agents*

Friday, September 20, 2013

Earlier this month, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman, her family, and her friends were detained for hours by US Customs and Border Protection on their way home from Canada. Everyone being held was a US citizen, and no one received an explanation. Sarah tells the story of their detainment, and her difficulty getting any answers from one of the least transparent agencies in the country.

William Tyler - Country of Illusion

[Hi folks. This piece has been getting a lot of traffic, so we wanted to direct you to more of Sarah's enormously good reporting if you're interested. A nice place to start is her firsthand account of what it was like to coordinate information for anti-Gaddafi rebels, or her profile last month of the newly launched Al-Jazeera America. Or you can just go here for all of her OTM appearances.]

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On The Media

Mapping Gun Owners, International Journalists Fight Censorship, and More

Friday, January 11, 2013

The ATF's desire for a central database of gun transactions, journalists fight for the right to report on India's rape trial, an interview with 56 Up director Michael Apted, and Chinese journalists strike after the government censored an Op-Ed.

On The Media

Censorship in the Largest Democracy in the World

Friday, January 11, 2013

The rape and murder of a young woman in India has brought protesters to the streets. Both the national and international press have closely followed the public outrage and tepid response from government officials, turning out in full force to see the accused men in court on Monday. The swarm of journalists prompted a local judge to not only ban reporters from the courtroom, but also prohibit anyone from covering the trial. Brooke talks with New York Times reporter Niharika Mandhana about the repercussions of the ban, and about why the government would keep the trial off the public record. 

Tinariwen - Walla Illa

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On The Media

Mexico's Illuminating Information Laws

Friday, November 16, 2012

Ten years ago, Mexico passed some of the best freedom of information laws in the world. But while the laws are great on paper, their implementation has been problematic. Brooke travels to Mexico City to learn more about why Mexico's sunshine laws still struggle to illuminate information for the public.

Los Lobos - La Iguana

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On The Media

Grading Obama's First Term

Friday, November 09, 2012

With one term down and one more to go, we take a look at how well the first Obama administration did on some of the issues OTM cares about most: surveillance, transparency, whistleblowers, and press access. Brooke and Bob speak with The Guardian's Glenn Greenwald, the Sunlight Foundation's Lisa Rosenberg, and ABC's White House correspondent Jake Tapper about Obama's first four years, and what they expect in the next four.

Nathan Salsburg_Eight Belles Dreamt the Devil Was Dead

Nathan Salsburg - Eight Belles Dreamt the Devil Was Dead

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On The Media

Campaign Finance Reform Bill Dies

Friday, July 20, 2012

The Obama and Romney campaigns have been slugging away at each other this week about transparency and disclosure. And yet Tuesday, the Disclose Act, which would have allowed you to better know the people behind superpacs was smothered in the Senate by filibuster without earning a single Republican vote. Huffington Post reporter Dan Froomkin explains to Brooke what happened.

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On The Media

Making Laws More Public

Friday, April 13, 2012

Carl Malamud, government transparency advocate and president of public.resource.org believes safety standards should be easily accessible to all citizens for free. Yet many of these standards  --  from the design of bicycle helmets to water treatment components to hazmat suits – are the copyrighted creation of the industry organizations that have promulgated them. So Malamud has ponied up the dough to purchase exactly 73 of these standards, which he will publish online, copyright or no copyright.

 

The Spinanes - Lure and Cast

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