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On The Media

#32 - An Imperfect Match

Thursday, July 31, 2014

This week, dating site OK Cupid put up a blog post describing experiments it conducted on its users. In one experiment, the site told users who were bad matches for one another that they were actually good matches, and vice versa. Alex and PJ talk to OK Cupid President and co-founder Christian Rudder about the ubiquity of online user experimentation and his defense of potentially sending OK Cupid's users on bad dates.

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Silliness and Moral Indignation

Friday, July 25, 2014

Brooke examines how comedians like Jon Stewart, John Oliver, and Stephen Colbert make us laugh by combining silliness and moral indignation.  

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On The Media

The Most Popular Satire Show in Israel

Friday, July 25, 2014

It’s been a violent, sad week. Sometimes the only way to wring anything positive out of it all is through the transformative power of comedy. Brooke talks with Sharon Taicher, a writer at Eretz Nehederet, a satire show watched by 1 out of 8 Israelis.

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On The Media

Flight MH17 and the Russian Media

Friday, July 25, 2014

In the wake of the crash of Malaysia airlines flight MH17, the Russian media has been providing its own theories about the source of the downed plane. Brooke talks with novelist and screenwriter Michael Idov, who lives in Moscow, about what he's seeing there.

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On The Media

Breaking News Consumer's Handbook: Airline Edition

Friday, July 25, 2014

When a commercial plane goes down, media speculation ensues. With the help of The Atlantic's James Fallows, we give you some tips that can help you comb through the coverage.

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On The Media

Loaded Language

Friday, July 25, 2014

For reporters covering the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, choosing the right words is a daunting task. So the International Press Institute set out to identify those hot-button words and phrases that the media throw around and create a glossary, called "Use With Care", that offers context and more neutral language. Brooke talks with Naomi Hunt, editor of the glossary and senior press freedom adviser at the IPI.

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On The Media

Gazan Media

Friday, July 25, 2014

In Gaza, the media that locals have access to is primarily Hamas-controlled. Brooke talks with Sherine Tadros, a middle east correspondent for Sky News who's spent years reporting from the region, about what Gazans are seeing, and what many of them have come to believe.

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On The Media

The War of the Words

Friday, July 25, 2014

Alongside the usual war for hearts and minds waged through conflicting narratives in the media, there’s a parallel fight happening on the rhetorical battlefield. Brooke talks with Jodi Rudoren, Jerusalem Bureau Chief for the New York Times, about her recent piece, “In Gaza, Epithets Are Fired and Euphemisms Give Shelter,” in which she explores the issue of semantics.

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On The Media

War of Words In Israel-Palestine, Downed Planes, and Dark Humor

Friday, July 25, 2014

A breaking news consumer's handbook for plane crashes, the challenges of choosing the right words in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and humor when the news is bleak. 

On The Media

TLDR #31 - Race Swap

Monday, July 21, 2014

The Internet you experience depends on who the Internet thinks you are.

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Truvada

Friday, July 18, 2014

Truvada is a drug that, taken daily, has been show to prevent HIV infection by as much as 99 percent. Like the polio vaccine, or like the birth control pill, it's a medical breakthrough worthy of massive coverage. Why hasn't there been? Brooke speaks to Rich Juzwiak, a Gawker staff writer, about the drug and what’s holding it back in the media.

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On The Media

Reporting on the "Border Crisis" From El Salvador

Friday, July 18, 2014

The past several weeks have seen a surge in coverage of the crisis on the US-Mexico border, and the media abounds with critics of immigration reform who fault the Obama administration's lax policies. Bob talks with Carlos Dada, co-founder and editor of the El Salvadoran newspaper El Faro, who says that US critics are completely missing the point.

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On The Media

Anti-Obamacare Ads (Really) Didn't Work

Friday, July 18, 2014

Spending on negative Obamacare ads eclipsed spending on positive ads by a remarkable 15-1 ratio. Brooke talks with Niam Yaraghi of the Brooking Institution, who says that anti-Obamacare ads actually drove up enrollment.  

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On The Media

Gaymes

Friday, July 18, 2014

Only a handful of mainstream video games feature gay characters. Bob talks with Samantha Leigh Allen, a transgender writer and academic, about some of the commercially successful games to include LBGT identities.

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On The Media

The End of 'Gun Report'

Friday, July 18, 2014

It was a New York Times blog that chronicled daily shootings across the country, in an effort to highlight victims of gun violence between highly-covered mass shootings. Co-author Jennifer Mascia recounts what it was like spending a year writing about every victim.

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On The Media

#31 - Race Swap

Thursday, July 17, 2014

What happened when a black woman writer went online disguised as a white man? She got a lot fewer death threats, for one thing.

 

 

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On The Media

The Super PAC to End Super PACs

Friday, July 11, 2014

On Independence Day, Harvard Law Professor Lawrence Lessig’s political fund aimed at ending the influence of money in campaigns reached its crowd funding goal of $5 million. Now can it elect a member of Congress committed to campaign finance reform?

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Behind the Border Crisis

Friday, July 11, 2014

For the past few weeks the media have been reporting on a surge in unaccompanied minors who are crossing the border illegally, bringing attention to the latest immigration crisis. But the reality of the situation is far more complicated. Brooke talks with reporter Bob Ortega about what's really happening on the border.

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On The Media

Online Supersleuths

Friday, July 11, 2014

There's an estimated 40,000 unidentified human remains in the United States. When writer Deborah Halber heard this figure, she did some research and discovered a thriving community of internet sleuths who spend hours trying to attach names to these John and Jane Does. Brooke speaks to Halber about her new book, The Skeleton Crew: How Amateur Sleuths Are Solving America’s Coldest Cases.

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On The Media

A FOIA Too Far

Friday, July 11, 2014

Jeff Scudder was working in the CIA's Historical Collections Division when he found a trove of documents that were declassified and ready for release to the public, but hadn't, due to bureaucratic strife. So he filed a FOIA request. Bob talks with Scudder about how this request ultimately resulted in his ousting from the agency.

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